Abstract

This essay adapts Judith Butler's theories on the performance of gender to investigate the performative nature of marriage in Thomas Dekker's city comedy, The Shoemaker's Holiday. The cross-class clandestine wedding of the main plot allows Rose to work against her father's demands, against class endogamy, and toward a choice that provides her with economic and emotional benefits. This wedding, read in the context of the play's multiple weddings and remarriages, suggests a critique of the class, paternal, and gender hierarchies such ceremonies are often assumed to support.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1522-9270
Print ISSN
0039-3657
Pages
pp. 333-355
Launched on MUSE
2005-06-01
Open Access
No
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