Abstract

This article examines one instance of a widely spread rumor (incipient legend) circulated via e-mail in northwest Detroit that Arab employees at a Middle Eastern restaurant cheered when they saw television footage of the planes crashing into the World Trade Center and the Pentagon on September 11, 2001. It argues that rumor and legend scholars, especially those examining alternative communication paths including Internet transmission, should work to retain the complexity of performance-oriented studies in their comparative analyses. It takes "the middle road" in building a case for examining, whenever possible, the complex intertwining of localized and globalized "folkloric space" for readings that are richly textured and evocative of a variety of social conditions.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1535-1882
Print ISSN
0021-8715
Pages
pp. 219-236
Launched on MUSE
2005-05-02
Open Access
No
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