Abstract

In the contexts of Venetian cartographic primacy and the publication of G.B.Ramu-sio's unique collection of travel accounts, this article examines the implications of the growing recognition of the entire earth's navigability, accessibility, and hence habitability--a recognition that shattered the traditional classical notion of zonal, partitioned confinement, in which three zones were too cold or too hot for human habitation. The ringing confidence of Ramusio and his circle regarding the total habitability of the earth, expressive of a new global consciousness on the part of Europeans, depended at least as much on Platonic philosophy and its belief in the universalizing plenitude and goodness of a rational creator as upon cartographic, geographic precision and empirical exploration.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1527-8050
Print ISSN
1045-6007
Pages
pp. 1-27
Launched on MUSE
2005-02-24
Open Access
No
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