Abstract

A well-known conflict over girls' education between a Victorian reformer and the leader of the Brahmo Samaj, a Hindu reformist sect, has often been held up as an example of British imperial condescension, or at least a failure of a westerner to understand Indian culture. A closer reexamination of events shows that there was greater complexity to the encounter. The conflict is clarified by discussion of the circumstances of both parties: Annette Akroyd's Unitarianism and education, and Keshub Chunder Sen's shifting theological position and role in the press activities of his zealous young missionaries.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1527-8050
Print ISSN
1045-6007
Pages
pp. 231-259
Launched on MUSE
2005-02-24
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.