In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:

  • Color Plates

Color Plate A


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No. 1. Bill Witherspoon, Desert Sri Yantra from 12,000 feet, Mickey Basin, Oregon, 1990. The Sri Yantra, ¼ mile across covering over 40 acres and with over 13 miles of lines, was plowed into the desert soil with an old-fashioned garden cultivator pulled by three crew members and steered by the fourth. The lines were about 4 inches deep, with the hard alkali-crusted dirt cast to both sides of the furrow.

© Bill Witherspoon

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Color Plate B


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No. 1. Michel Bret, Marie-Hélène Tramus and Alain Berthoz, The Virtual Tightrope Walker, 2004. A spectator interacts with an intelligent dancing figure.

© Michel Bret


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No. 2. Dennis Dollens, Xfrog-generated, Rhino-edited, and 3D Studio MAX rendering of the tree in Fig. 6 with its trunk removed and glass floors grown from its branch nodes in place of leaves. This sequence illustrates the potential of digitally growing architecture.

© Dennis Dollens

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Color Plate C


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No. 1. Andrea Polli, Atmospherics/Weather Works. Screenshots of the web-based interactive application featured as an Artport Gate Page on the Whitney Museum of American Art's web site in May 2004.

© Andrea Polli


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No. 2. Yury Alekseyevich Pravdyuk, fragment (still) from a light-composition made for S. Prokofiev's opera War and Peace (the still corresponds to the waltz from "The First Ball of Natasha Rostova"). (See Historical Perspective by Sergei Zorin, p. 60.)

Photo © S. Zorin

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Color Plate D


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No. 1. Steven J. Oscherwitz, Oscherwitz's Compound Picture, oil painting on linen, photographed and then scanned and digitally placed within a photographed image of laminar flow, 2003. From Milton Van Dyke, An Album of Fluid Motion (Stanford, CA: Parabolic Press, 1982) p. 31. Both images were then similarly placed within a photographed, scanned image of cancerous cells. The resultant work is what I call a "compound picture." Compound pictures can integrate images from previously isolated disciplines, thereby acting not only as a metaphor for interdisciplinary integration, but because of advances in nanotechnology, as a site for their literal integration.

© Steven J. Oscherwitz. Photo © Eduardo Calderón© Steven J. Oscherwitz. Photo © Eduardo Calderón


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No. 2. Julian Voss-Andreae, the 58-amino-acid protein Bovine Pancreatic Trypsin Inhibitor (BPTI) in different renditions. (a) to (d) are the renditions typically encountered in the scientific literature. (e) and (f) depict the same protein as mitered cut sculptures.

© Wiley-VCH © Julian Voss-Andreae

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Additional Information

ISSN
1530-9282
Print ISSN
0024-094X
Pages
pp. 37-40
Launched on MUSE
2005-02-21
Open Access
No
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