Abstract

Personal interviews with and written accounts by eight former members of the Kindertransport enable a consideration of the issue of class and religious affiliation when matching Kindertransport children and host families. The authors also investigate issues relating to the reception of the children in Britain such as public antisemitism. They conclude that social class had more bearing on the adaptation of the Kindertransport children than did religion and language.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1534-5165
Print ISSN
0882-8539
Pages
pp. 28-40
Launched on MUSE
2005-01-06
Open Access
No
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