Abstract

This article evaluates the stereotypical image of mining society--of rigidly segregated sex roles and patriarchy--in an examination of women in mining communities in central Northumberland, England from 1900 to 1939. The author identifies two contrasting female identities: "domestic women" who fit the picture of subordination to males and of domesticity and who bore a maternal and domestic burden more onerous than that of other working-class women; and "political women" who rejected the lifestyle of their peers, chose a public life of political action, and fought for socialist and feminist causes. These findings suggest that, even in traditional communities known for homogeneity and conformity, female identity was variable and women embraced new ideologies to express their identities.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1527-2036
Print ISSN
1042-7961
Pages
pp. 107-131
Launched on MUSE
2001-07-01
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.