Abstract

Amy Jacques-Garvey (1896-1973) was the second wife of Marcus Mosiah Garvey and unofficial leader of the Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA), the largest Pan-African movement in the twentieth century. Jacques-Garvey mastered what Taylor calls community feminism. Community feminism allowed black women to function within their communities as both helpmates and leaders. An examination of Jacques-Garvey's editorials published in the Negro World, the propaganda newspaper for the UNIA, reveals her brand of community feminism and how her choices were political--transforming her from a personal secretary, editor, and wife into an indispensable UNIA leader during the 1920s.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1527-2036
Print ISSN
1042-7961
Pages
pp. 104-126
Launched on MUSE
2000-07-01
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.