In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:

  • Publications of Note

Memoir of a Trustbuster: A Lifelong Adventure with Japan. By Eleanor M. Hadley with Patricia Hagan Kuwayama. University of Hawai'i Press, Honolulu, 2002. xviii, 175 pages. $22.00. While working on her doctorate in economics, Hadley was recruited by the U.S. government for her knowledge of zaibatsu and became one of General Douglas MacArthur's key advisers during the occupation. When she returned to complete her degree, she learned she had been blacklisted. Seventeen years passed before Hadley's name was cleared; she returned to government service in 1967 and began a distinguished career as a senior policy analyst with the U.S. Tariff Commission and the General Accounting Office.

The Noh Ominameshi: A Flower Viewed from Many Directions. Edited by Mae J. Smethurst; coedited by Christina Laffin. Cornell East Asia Series, Ithaca, 2003. xxvi, 332 pages. $27.00, paper. By focusing on a single play, the essays in this collection "show some of the breadth and depth that is available for the study of Japanese literature and drama both in Japan and abroad" (p. xvii). Scholars wrote in their own language, English or Japanese, and a summary of each contribution is provided in the other language. In addition to the editors, contributors are Amano Fumio, Monica Bethe, Steven T. Brown, Susan Blakeley Klein, William R. LaFleur, Susan Matisoff, Carolyn A. Morley, Nishino Haruo, Takemoto Mikio, Arthur H. Thornhill III, Uzawa Hisa, and Wakita Haruko.

Japans Karneval der Krise: Ējanaika und die Meiji-Renovation. By Reinhard Zöllner. iudicium verlag, München, 2003. 497 pages. €35.00, paper. This study of the Ējanaika phenomenon of 1867 and 1868 looks at the "carnival-like celebrations and dances" in various regions of Japan. Through this systematic interpretation, the author explores the mentality, religiosity, and folk culture of Japan as it entered its modern period.

Memoir of a Trustbuster: A Lifelong Adventure with Japan. By Eleanor M. Hadley with Patricia Hagan Kuwayama. University of Hawai'i Press, Honolulu, 2002. xviii, 175 pages. $22.00.

While working on her doctorate in economics, Hadley was recruited by the U.S. government for her knowledge of zaibatsu and became one of General Douglas MacArthur's key advisers during the occupation. When she returned to complete her degree, she learned she had been blacklisted. Seventeen years passed before Hadley's name was cleared; she returned to government service in 1967 and began a distinguished career as a senior policy analyst with the U.S. Tariff Commission and the General Accounting Office.

The Noh Ominameshi: A Flower Viewed from Many Directions. Edited by Mae J. Smethurst; coedited by Christina Laffin. Cornell East Asia Series, Ithaca, 2003. xxvi, 332 pages. $27.00, paper.

By focusing on a single play, the essays in this collection "show some of the breadth and depth that is available for the study of Japanese literature and drama both in Japan and abroad" (p. xvii). Scholars wrote in their own language, English or Japanese, and a summary of each contribution is provided in the other language. In addition to the editors, contributors are Amano Fumio, Monica Bethe, Steven T. Brown, Susan Blakeley Klein, William R. LaFleur, Susan Mati-soff, Carolyn A. Morley, Nishino Haruo, Takemoto Mikio, Arthur H. Thorn-hill III, Uzawa Hisa, and Wakita Haruko.

Japans Karneval der Krise: Ē janaika und die Meiji-Renovation. By Reinhard Zöllner. iudicium verlag, München, 2003. 497 pages. €35.00, paper.

This study of the ējanaika phenomenon of 1867 and 1868 looks at the "carnival like celebrations and dances" in various regions of Japan. Through this systematic interpretation, the author explores the mentality, religiosity, and folk culture of Japan as it entered its modern period. [End Page 581]

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Additional Information

ISSN
1549-4721
Print ISSN
0095-6848
Pages
p. 581
Launched on MUSE
2004-07-30
Open Access
No
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