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French Historical Studies 27.3 (2004) 705-707



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Prizewinners

The David H. Pinkney Prize is awarded annually by the Society for French Historical Studies for the best book on French history by a North American scholar. The winner for 2003 is Ronald Schechter, College of William and Mary, for Obstinate Hebrews: Representations of Jews in France, 1715–1815 (Berkeley, CA, 2003). Honorable mention goes to Michael Bess, Vanderbilt University, for The Light-Green Society: Ecology and Technological Modernity in France, 1960–2000 (Chicago, 2003).

The William Koren Jr. Prize is awarded annually by the Society for French Historical Studies for the best article on French history by a North American scholar. The winner for 2003 is Richard I. Jobs, Pacific University, for "Tarzan under Attack: Youth, Comics, and Cultural Reconstruction in Postwar France," French Historical Studies 26 (2003): 687–725. Honorable mention goes to Jo�lle Rollo-Koster, University of Rhode Island, for "The Politics of Body Parts: Contested Topographies in Late-Medieval Avignon," Speculum 78 (2003): 66–98.

The Gilbert Chinard Prize, awarded annually by the Society for French Historical Studies and the Institut Français de Washington, recognizes the best book on the history of themes shared by France and the Americas. The winner for 2003 is Brent Hayes Edwards, Rutgers University, for The Practice of Diaspora: Literature, Translation, and the Rise of Black Internationalism (Cambridge, MA, 2003).

The Research Travel Award, given annually by the Society for French Historical Studies and the Western Society for French History, is presented to a PhD without tenure for research undertaken outside North America on any aspect of the history of France. The winner for 2003 is Richard Keyser, Western Kentucky University, for "From Gift to Contract: The Transformation of Medieval Property Dealings, Champagne, 1100–1350."

The John B. and Theta H. Wolf Award, administered jointly by the Society for French Historical Studies and the Western Society for French History, is presented annually to a doctoral candidate at a U.S. or Canadian university for dissertation research on a scholarly project in French history (any period) that reflects John Wolf's interest in and contributions to the study of European history. The winner for 2003 is Camille Robcis, PhD candidate at Cornell University, for "Rethinking the Family: Psychoanalysis, Anthropology, and the Problem of Kinship in France."

The Marjorie M. Farrar Memorial Award is given annually by the Society for French Historical Studies to a doctoral student in French history at a North American university to support work on an outstanding dissertation in progress. The winner for 2003 is William Max Nelson, PhD candidate at the [End Page 705] University of California, Los Angeles, for "The Weapon of Time: Constructing the Future in France, 1750 to Year I."

Call for Papers

The editors of French Historical Studies are soliciting articles for the special issue "Mobility in French History," guest-edited by Carla Hesse and Peter Sahlins. Articles are welcome on research subjects from any period—medieval to modern—and from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. The editors hope that the issue will consider all aspects of the topic of mobility, from the demographic and the social to the economic, political, and cultural. Two concerns animate and guide this special issue: (1) an interest in examining the relationship between internal and external exchanges of peoples, goods, and meanings, and (2) an interest in interrogating the relationships between different levels of movement and exchange, from the movement of peoples (geographic and social) to the movement of capital and cultural goods. In the wake of the collapse of the modernization and Marxist paradigms of the Cold War era, might it now be possible for historians of a specific geopolitical entity—France and its former colonies—to reconceptualize, or at least to bring back into dialogue, investigations of the history of the movements of peoples, goods, and ideas that now shape the dynamics of France in relation to Europe and the global community?

Three themes are particularly exigent for inquiry:

  1. Historiography and periodization. Until recently, "mobility" has been an uncommon trope in French historiography, which has been dominated for decades by the Annales-inspired notion...

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Additional Information

ISSN
1527-5493
Print ISSN
0016-1071
Pages
pp. 705-707
Launched on MUSE
2004-07-29
Open Access
No
Archive Status
Archived 2004
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