Abstract

Stolen Generations testimonies offer insights into the history, effects, and legacies of colonization in Australia—a history that is currently being contested in the public domain. In this essay, I analyze the ways in which these testimonies address audiences, and the ways in which listeners respond, taking my classroom as a particular site of reception. Based on an analysis of some of my students' responses, I suggest that Stolen Generations testimonies sometimes provoke non-Indigenous teachers and students to become aware of our own subject-positions as the inheritors of a post/colonial legacy, a consciousness that can potentially contribute to the reconciliation process in Australia.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1529-1456
Print ISSN
0162-4962
Pages
pp. 48-77
Launched on MUSE
2004-06-25
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.