Abstract

Throughout the Analects, Confucius describes the capacity for grief as an ethically valuable trait. Here his own display of grief at the premature death of his beloved student Yan Hui is investigated as a model of the meaning and significance of grief in a flourishing life. This display, it is argued, provides a valuable portrait, in situ, of the specific species of grief that Confucius sanctions and encourages. It likewise makes clear the role played by vulnerability to injury in the articulation of well-being and value.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1529-1898
Print ISSN
0031-8221
Pages
pp. 279-301
Launched on MUSE
2004-05-28
Open Access
No
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