Abstract

King Charles X's royal decree of 17 April 1825 recognizing Haiti's independence and the subsequent law setting rules for the allocation of Haitian reparations to former French planters were met with widespread discussion and opposition in both French parliamentary chambers. Opponents attacked Villèle's government on both substance and form, some refusing to accept the loss of colonial property rights in Haiti, others denying the king the right to grant independence to a colony without parliamentary approval. The debate, which ended in the government's favor, raised for the first time some fundamental issues about the process of decolonization in a French context.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1543-7787
Print ISSN
1539-3402
Pages
pp. 125-138
Launched on MUSE
2004-05-17
Open Access
No
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