Abstract

The dynamic interaction of patients and medical practitioners has emerged as one of the more important questions in the the study of the history of medical institutions.The diary of the "Capri Pirates," a group of patients in a German tuberculosis sanitorium during the late 1950s, offers a unique view of patients' experience in long-term medical treatment.The secondary adaptation of patients, the effects of gender segregation and male bonding in patients' communities, andthe coexistence of medical and social hierarchies within institutions all demonstrate the benefits of an interdisciplinary agenda in the study of modern medicine.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1530-9169
Print ISSN
0022-1953
Pages
pp. 243-262
Launched on MUSE
2001-08-01
Open Access
No
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