Abstract

Naturalized moral epistemology eschews practices of assuming to know a priori the nature of situations and experiences that require moral deliberation. Thus it promises to close a gap between formal ethical theories and circumstances where people need guidelines for action. Yet according experience so central a place in inquiry risks "naturalizing" it, treating it as incontestable, separating its moral and political dimensions. This essay discusses these issues with reference to Margaret Walker's Moral understandings.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1527-2001
Print ISSN
0887-5367
Pages
pp. 156-173
Launched on MUSE
2002-01-01
Open Access
No
Archive Status
Archived 2009
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