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SOCIETY FOR FRENCH HISTORICAL STUDIES

Annual meeting, 8–10 March 2001. The annual meeting of the Society for French Historical Studies will take place at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Special events include exhibits of French art and rare French books at the university’s Ackland Art Museum and Wilson Library.

A plenary session featuring Professors Eric Fassin (Ecole Normale Supérieure) and Richard Kuisel (Georgetown University) will examine the recent history and problems of French American cross-cultural perceptions, conflicts, and stereotypes. Other visitors from France will participate in various sessions and panels, and Professor Robert Forster (Johns Hopkins University, emeritus) will speak at a concluding banquet on the new global perspectives influencing the study of French history. Conference participants will be invited to attend a special concert with musicians from Francophone regions of West Africa.

In addition to papers on a wide range of topics in French history, the conference will provide a distinctive, new “salon-style” format at the 9 March lunch. A host at each table will lead a conversation on a specific theme, era, or problem in French history, and everyone will have the opportunity to add a bon mot. Participants will select a thematic table when they sign up for lunch.

For more information contact Professors Lloyd Kramer and Donald Reid, History Department, CB 3195, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, or visit the conference Web site at www.unc.edu/depts/history/faculty/sfhs.html.

VISUAL ARTS IN THE WRITING OF FRENCH HISTORY

Call for submissions. The editors of French Historical Studies seek contributions for a special issue that focuses on the visual arts in the writing of French history. Submissions dealing with any period of French history, from the Middle Ages to the present, and with any aspect of the visual sphere are welcome, as are all disciplinary or theoretical perspectives compatible with the journal’s historical orientation. We are especially interested in interdisciplinary articles that consider visual culture, broadly defined, as a dynamic field of exchange between political, economic, social, and cultural history, and in articles that take these categories not as fixed but as mutually constitutive. Although we expect that most of the contributions will be based on primary sources, we also hope that they will offer some reflection on the visual as a category of historical analysis. Theoretical, methodological, and historiographical articles on the relationship between the disciplinary practices of history and art history, with [End Page 135] specific reference to France, are also welcome. Authors should indicate in a cover letter that they intend the article for the special issue on visual culture; the journal’s standard review policy will apply. Manuscripts should be submitted to the editors by 1 October 2001.

WHAT IS COLONIAL HISTORY?

Call for submissions. The editors of French Historical Studies seek contributions for a special issue that focuses on the history of French colonialism and the writing of that history. France’s colonial past has begun to attract considerable attention from French historians. Yet its earlier marginal status, combined with the convention of training scholars in only one national history, has left the contours of this emerging field ambiguous. What is colonial history, in the French context? Was activity in the colonies critical to developments (political, cultural, and other) in France? If so, how do we reintegrate colonialism into the history of the metropole without disenfranchising the formerly colonized? Or is all colonial history necessarily transnational history, which French historians must now learn to write? Finally, how can postcolonial, literary, and gender theories be used most effectively by historians interested in French colonialism?

Submissions dealing with any aspect of colonialism are welcome, as are all disciplinary or theoretical perspectives compatible with the journal’s historical orientation. We are especially interested in articles that not only examine a particular facet of French colonialism but also reflect on the author’s approach to the topic. Although we expect that most of the contributions will be based on primary sources, we welcome theoretical, methodological, and historiographical articles on the relationship between the national and the colonial and/or between the “old” colonial history and the “new.” Authors should indicate in...

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Additional Information

ISSN
1527-5493
Print ISSN
0016-1071
Pages
pp. 135-136
Launched on MUSE
2001-01-01
Open Access
No
Archive Status
Archived 2004
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