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  • Books Received
Ager, Sheila L. Interstate Arbitrations in the Greek World, 337–90 B.C. Berkeley, Los Angeles, and London: University of California Press, 1996. xvii 1 579 pp. Cloth, $70, £55 (foreign). (Hellenistic Culture and Society, 18)
Anderson, William S., ed. Ovid’s Metamorphoses: Books 1–5. With introduction and commentary. Norman and London: University of Oklahoma Press, 1997. vi 1 578 pp. Cloth, $49.95.
Bakker, Egbert J. Poetry in Speech: Orality and Homeric Discourse. Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, 1997. xvi 1 237 pp. Cloth, $49.95. (Myth and Poetics)
Barnes, Johnathan, and Miriam Griffin, eds. Philosophia Togata. Vol. II, Plato and Aristotle at Rome. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1997. x 1 300 pp. Cloth, price not stated. [Contents: Johnathan Barnes, “Roman Aristotle,” 1–69; Andrew Lintott, “The Theory of the Mixed Constitution at Rome,” 70–85; Miriam Griffin, “From Aristotle to Atticus: Cicero and Matius on Friendship,” 86–109; David Sedley, “Plato’s Auctoritas and the Rebirth of the Commentary Tradition,” 110–29; Thomas Tarver, “Varro and the Antiquarianism of Philosophy,” 130–64; Simon Swain, “Plutarch, Plato, Athens, and Rome,” 165–87; Leofranc Holford-Strevens, “Favorinus: The Man of Paradoxes,” 188–217; Michael Frede, “Celsus’ Attack on the Christians,” 218–40; Fergus Millar, “Porphyry: Ethnicity, Language, and Alien Wisdom,” 241–62.]
Benitez, Eugenio, ed. Dialogues with Plato. Edmonton, Alta.: Academic Printing and Publishing, 1996. viii 1 215 pp. Cloth, Can. $59.95; paper, $21.95. (Apeiron 24.4, December 1996) [Contents: Douglas Blyth, “What in Plato’s Crito is Benefited by Justice and Harmed by Injustice?” 1–19; Eugenio Benitez, “Deliberation and Moral Expertise in Plato’s Crito,” 21–47; Patrick Yong, “Intellectualism and Moral Habituation in Plato’s Earlier Dialogues,” 49–61; Martin McAvoy, “Carnal Knowledge in the Charmides,” 63–103; Harold Tarrant, “Plato, Prejudice, and the Mature-Age Student in Antiquity,” 105–20; Dirk Baltzly, “Socratic Anti-Empiricism in the Phaedo,” 121–42; Andrew Barker, “Plato’s Philebus: The Numbering of a Unity,” 143–64; Diane O’Leary-Hawthorne, “Not-Being and Linguistic Deception,” 165–98.]
Blössner, Norbert. Dialogform und Argument: Studien zu Platons “Politeia.” Mainz: Akademie der Wissenschaften und der Literatur; Stuttgart: Franz Steiner, 1997. 358 pp. Paper, DM 94. (Abhandlungen der Akademie der Wissenschaften und der Literatur, Geistes- und Sozialwissenschaftliche Klasse, Jahrgang 1997, 1)
Bloomer, W. Martin. Latinity and Literary Society at Rome. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1997. viii 1 327 pp. Cloth, $39.95.
Bos, E. P., ed. Gabriel Nuchelmans: Studies on the History of Logic and Semantics, 12th-17th Centuries. Aldershot, Hants.: Variorum, 1996. viii 1 334 pp. Cloth, $94.95. (Collected Studies Series C560) [Seventeen essays, 1957–94.]
Briggs, Ward W., ed. Ancient Greek Authors. Detroit, Washington, D.C., and London: A Bruccoli Clark Layman Book/Gale Research, 1997. xvi 1 472 pp. Numerous ills. Cloth, price not stated. (Dictionary of Literary Biography, 176)
Carracedo Fraga, J., ed. Liber de Ortu et Obitu Patriarcharum. Turnholt: Brepols, 1996. 297 pp. (1*-65*, 1–132). Paper, price not stated. (Corpus Christianorum, Series Latina, 108E, Scriptores Celtigenae, Part 1)
Cittadini, Margherita Rossi, ed. Presenze classiche nelle letterature occidentali: il mito dall’età antica all’età moderna e contemporanea. Atti, Convegno Internazionale di Didattica, Perugia, 7–10 novembre 1990. Perugia: IRRSAE dell’Umbria, 1995. xliv 1 567 pp. Cloth, price not stated.
Clauss, James J., and Sarah Iles Johnston, eds. Medea: Essays on Medea in Myth, Literature, Philosophy, and Art. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1997. xiv 1 374 pp. 5 ills. Cloth, $55, £45; paper, $17.95, £14.95. [Contents: Fritz Graf, “Medea, the Enchantress from Afar: Remarks on a Well-known Myth,” 21–43; Sarah Iles Johnston, “Medea and the Cult of Hera Akraia,” 44–70; Nita Kravans, “Medea as Foundation-Heroine,” 71–82; Jan N. Bremmer, “Why Did Medea Kill Her Brother Apsyrtus?” 83–100; Delores M. O’Higgins, “Medea as Muse: Pindar’s Pythian 4,” 103–26; Deborah Boedeker, “Becoming Medea: Assimilation in Euripides,” 127–48; James J. Clauss, “Conquest of the Mephistophelian Nausicaa: Medea’s Role in Apollonios’ Redefinition of the Epic Hero,” 149–77; Carole E. Newlands, “The Metamorphosis of Ovid’s Medea,” 178–208; John M. Dillon, “Medea among the Philosophers,” 211–18; Martha C...

Additional Information

ISSN
1086-3168
Print ISSN
0002-9475
Pages
pp. 649-656
Launched on MUSE
1997-12-01
Open Access
No
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