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Southeastern Europe and the Question of Knowledge, Capital, and Power

From: The Global South
Volume 5, Number 1, Spring 2011
pp. 51-65 | 10.1353/gbs.2011.0009

Abstract

Abstract:

I want to rethink some of the processes implemented in Southeastern Europe in order to explore the logic of global capitalism, the changes it brought to territory, the understanding of hegemony, democracy, and zoning, shifting, ideology, and underdevelopment. Southeastern Europe (which, for the purpose of clarification, consists of Albania, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Greece, Kosovo, Macedonia, Montenegro, Romania, Serbia, and Slovenia) has come to be synonymous with animosity between the above countries. With the exception of Greece, which has been a member of the European Union since 1981, and Slovenia, which became a member on May 1, 2004, followed by Bulgaria and Romania in the second wave of enlargement of EU on January 1, 2007, the “rest” of the regions within Southeastern Europe has been currently renamed the “West Balkans.” The most important condition that the “Southeastern/West rest” must satisfy to be eligible for future EU membership is the establishment of a functioning democracy with its coincident rule of (neoliberal capitalist) law.



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