We are unable to display your institutional affiliation without JavaScript turned on.
Browse Book and Journal Content on Project MUSE
OR

Find using OpenURL

Buy This Issue

Left-Wing Elitism: Adorno on Popular Culture

From: Philosophy and Literature
Volume 14, Number 1, April 1990
pp. 65-78 | 10.1353/phl.1990.0054

In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:

Footnotes

1. See T.-W. Adorno, Aesthetic Theory, trans. C. Lehnhardt (London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1984).

2. Herbert Marcuse, The Aesthetic Dimension (Boston: Beacon Press, 1978).

3. In particular, see Adorno's essays, "Über den Fetischcharakter in der Musik," in Adorno, Gesammelte Schriften, vol. 14, ed. Rolf Tiedemann (Frankfurt: Suhrkamp, 1980), hereafter cited as "ÜFM"; and "Über Jazz," in Adorno, Gesammelte Schriften, vol. 17, hereafter "ÜJ."

4. See Herbert Marcuse, Eros and Civilization (New York: Random House, 1955).

5. See Adorno, Philosophie der Neuen Musik (Tubingen: J.C.B. Mohr, 1949), hereafter PNM; "ÜFM," p. 19.

6. See Jean-Paul Sartre, What Is Literature?, trans. Bernard Frechtman (London: Methuen, 1967), p. 14.

7. Ibid., pp. 15-16.

8. See Herbert Marcuse, An Essay on Liberation (Boston: Beacon Press, 1969).

9. See Martin Heidegger, Sein und Zeit (Tubingen: Max Neimeyer, 1979), §40.

10. Others have accepted Adorno's views on popular music, among them Frederic Jameson, in his Marxism and Form (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1971), p. 15.

11. The "jazz" composition Adorno refers to most often is Tiger Rag; his picture of the jazz "enthusiast" as a frenzied jitter-bugger, dancing to the vital rhythms of depraved Negermusik, requires no commentary. In addition to the essays already mentioned, see Adorno, Quasi una fantasia (Paris: Gallimard, 1982), pp. 56-57.

12. Adorno mentions this point, although he seems not to have grasped its significance; see "ÜJ," p. 85.

13. Adorno reduces the performance element in jazz to mere virtuosity; see "ÜFM," pp. 47-48; "ÜJ," p. 85.

14. In that respect, Adorno's remark ("ÜFM," p. 44) that "One must have a lot of free time and not much freedom to become a jazz expert" carries an unintended irony.

15. Adorno in fact objects to turning high culture into a commodity; much of "ÜFM" addresses this point.

16. See Marcuse, The Aesthetic Dimension, p. 34.

17. Adorno, Aesthetic Theory, p. 340.

Copyright © 1990 The Johns Hopkins University Press
Project MUSE® - View Citation
Bruce Baugh. "Left-Wing Elitism: Adorno on Popular Culture." Philosophy and Literature 14.1 (1990): 65-78. Project MUSE. Web. 26 Jan. 2013. <http://muse.jhu.edu/>.
Baugh, B.(1990). Left-Wing Elitism: Adorno on Popular Culture. Philosophy and Literature 14(1), 65-78. The Johns Hopkins University Press. Retrieved January 26, 2013, from Project MUSE database.
Bruce Baugh. "Left-Wing Elitism: Adorno on Popular Culture." Philosophy and Literature 14, no. 1 (1990): 65-78. http://muse.jhu.edu/ (accessed January 26, 2013).
TY - JOUR
T1 - Left-Wing Elitism: Adorno on Popular Culture
A1 - Bruce Baugh
JF - Philosophy and Literature
VL - 14
IS - 1
SP - 65
EP - 78
PY - 1990
PB - The Johns Hopkins University Press
SN - 1086-329X
UR - http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/philosophy_and_literature/v014/14.1.baugh.html
N1 - Volume 14, Number 1, April 1990
ER -

...



You must be logged in through an institution that subscribes to this journal or book to access the full text.

Shibboleth

Shibboleth authentication is only available to registered institutions.

Project MUSE

For subscribing associations only.