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I Ate My Mate

From: The Missouri Review
Volume 36, Number 4, 2013
p. 144 | 10.1353/mis.2013.0109

In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:

In Memory, JTB

By the time you realize how
I’ve shrunk enough that two
beetles shoulder to shoulder
in the aisles of a cabbage leaf
could give me the what-for

I’ll be aweigh on the swells
of night, galley engorged
with slurpings, but light getting
lighter becomes the weighty
nature of an old dragon lady

whose spasms slather the sky
as galaxies glide through my black
holes and I stretch to accept
each spurt of twinkling cloud.

Michelle Boisseau  

“For a while now I’ve been playing around with scale, testing how the tight universe of the poem can shift us quickly through the micro and macro. Through the interplay of line and syntax, metaphor and sound, we can scoot, soar and plummet—the way with Google Earth we float above continents, enter the stars and then, with a quick scroll, we’re zooming in on our own gray roof among many gray roofs. It takes just another push of the imagination, a stride across a stanza break or the snap of a clause, and we can find ourselves tiny inside the tiny, walking the city of a cell. I’ve been reading, very casually, about the origin of and evolution of life on earth and speculations that the first cell, the first life, came from reactions between rocks and chemicals on seafloors of acid oceans. One evolutionary biologist has said recently about the origin of life: ‘The line between the quick and dead is a little fuzzy.’ This fuzziness of the line might look sharp from a distance or like a cloud up close.”

Michelle Boisseau received her second NEA poetry fellowship in 2010. A Sunday in God-Years, her fourth book of poems, was published by University of Arkansas Press 2009; the press also published her third book, Trembling Air, a PEN USA finalist, in 2003. Her textbook, Writing Poems (Longman), in its eighth edition, is coauthored with Hadara Bar-Nadav. She teaches in the MFA program at the University of Missouri–Kansas City. Recent work has appeared in Poetry, Yale Review, Cincinnati Review and Miramar.

Copyright © 2013 The Curators of the University of Missouri
Project MUSE® - View Citation
Michelle Boisseau. "I Ate My Mate, and: Children Visiting Hospice, and: Nothing Is the Most We Ever Know, and: Wax for the Sleigh Runners, and: Head of Steam, and: The Voyage of the Sentence Begins, and: Happy Birthday to You, You Live in a Zoo." The Missouri Review 36.4 (2013): 143-150. Project MUSE. Web. 22 Jul. 2014. <http://muse.jhu.edu/>.
Boisseau, M.(2013). I Ate My Mate, and: Children Visiting Hospice, and: Nothing Is the Most We Ever Know, and: Wax for the Sleigh Runners, and: Head of Steam, and: The Voyage of the Sentence Begins, and: Happy Birthday to You, You Live in a Zoo. The Missouri Review 36(4), 143-150. University of Missouri. Retrieved July 22, 2014, from Project MUSE database.
Michelle Boisseau. "I Ate My Mate, and: Children Visiting Hospice, and: Nothing Is the Most We Ever Know, and: Wax for the Sleigh Runners, and: Head of Steam, and: The Voyage of the Sentence Begins, and: Happy Birthday to You, You Live in a Zoo." The Missouri Review 36, no. 4 (2013): 143-150. http://muse.jhu.edu/ (accessed July 22, 2014).
TY - JOUR
T1 - I Ate My Mate, and: Children Visiting Hospice, and: Nothing Is the Most We Ever Know, and: Wax for the Sleigh Runners, and: Head of Steam, and: The Voyage of the Sentence Begins, and: Happy Birthday to You, You Live in a Zoo
A1 - Boisseau, Michelle
JF - The Missouri Review
VL - 36
IS - 4
SP - 143
EP - 150
PY - 2013
PB - University of Missouri
SN - 1548-9930
UR - http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/missouri_review/v036/36.4.boisseau.html
N1 - Volume 36, Number 4, 2013
ER -

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