Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society

Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society: A Quarterly Journal in American Philosophy
Volume 42, Number 2, Spring 2006

CONTENTS

Articles

    Colapietro, Vincent Michael, 1950-
  • Toward a Pragmatic Conception of Practical Identity
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    Subject Headings:
    • Identity (Philosophical concept)
    • Agent (Philosophy)
    • Pragmatism.
    • Peirce, Charles S. (Charles Sanders), 1839-1914.
    • Kant, Immanuel, 1724-1804.
    Abstract:
      The author of this paper explores a central strand in the complex relationship between Peirce and Kant. He argues, against Kant (especially as reconstructed by Christine Korsgaard), that the practical identity of the self-critical agent who undertakes a Critic of reason (as Peirce insisted upon translating this expression) needs to be conceived in substantive, not purely formal, terms. Thus, insofar as there is a reflexive turn in Peirce, it is quite far from the transcendental turn taken by Immanuel Kant. The identity of the being devoted to redefining the bounds of reason (for the drawing of such bounds is always a historically situated and motivated undertaking) is not that of a disembodied, rational will giving laws to itself. Nor is it that of a being whose passions and especially sentiments are heteronomous determinations of the deliberative agency in question. Rather the identity of this being is that of a somatic, social, and historical agent whose very autonomy not only traces its origin to heteronomy but also ineluctably involves an identification with what, time and again, emerges as other than this agent.

      A strong claim is made regarding human identity being practical identity (practical identity being understood here as the singular shape acquired by a human being in the complex course of its practical involvements, its participation in the array of practices in and through which such a being carries out its life). An equally strong claim is made regarding the upshot of Peirce's decisive movement beyond Kant's transcendental project: this movement unquestionably drives toward a compelling account of human agency.

    Tiller, Glenn.
  • The Unknowable: The Pragmatist Critique of Matter
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    Subject Headings:
    • Matter.
    • Materialism.
    • Pragmatism.
    • Santayana, George, 1863-1952.
    Abstract:
      Santayana's materialism is often the target of attack by critics past and present that are sympathetic to pragmatism. A common theme found in the objections of Santayana's critics is that matter is "unknowable". After briefly outlining Santayana's materialism and discussing his relationship to the pragmatist movement, four formulations of the "unknowable" objection are presented: (1) Matter is unknowable because it is not given in experience, (2) Matter is unknowable because its true nature cannot be revealed in perception, (3) Matter is unknowable because it has no properties, (4) Matter is unknowable because existence is a surd. It is argued that these objections are based in part on persistent misunderstandings of Santayana's materialism and that some of the more controversial aspects of his ontology are similar to ideas found in the writings of James and Peirce.
    Welchman, Jennifer.
  • William James's "The Will to Believe" and the Ethics of Self-experimentation
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    Subject Headings:
    • James, William, 1842-1910. Will to believe.
    • Belief and doubt.
    • Research -- Moral and ethical aspects.
    Abstract:
      William James's "The Will to Believe" has been criticized for offering untenable arguments in support of belief in unvalidated hypotheses. Although James is no longer accused of suggesting we can create belief ex nihilo, critics continue to charge that James's defense of belief in what he called the "religious hypothesis" confuses belief with hypothesis adoption and endorses willful persistence in unvalidated beliefs—not, as he claimed, in pursuit of truth, but merely to avoid the emotional stress of abandoning them. I argue that James's position in "The Will to Believe" can be defended provided we give up thinking of it as ethics of belief and think of it instead as an ethics of self-experimentation. Subjective data (including wants, needs, and desires) are relevant to rational consent to participation in research.
    Geniusas, Saulius.
  • Is the Self of Social Behaviorism Capable of Auto-Affection? Mead and Marion on the "I" and the "Me"
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    Subject Headings:
    • Self (Philosophy)
    • Self-perception.
    • Mead, George Herbert, 1863-1931.
    • Marion, Jean-Luc, 1946-
    Abstract:
      The purpose of this manuscript is to bring Mead's pragmatism into contact with Jean-Luc Marion's phenomenology. Taking as its focus the question of the I-pole of the self, the paper points to the absence and the need of a concept like auto-affection in Mead's analysis of selfhood. A pragmatic appropriation of this concept does not undermine the social framework of selfhood because the most rudimentary self-givenness is immediate and direct, yet simultaneously a posteriori. The social and biological genesis of mind, self and society reserves a prominent place for auto-affection, which liberates the self from his estrangement within the horizon of objecthood by acknowledging a multiplicity of types of self-givenness besides that of self-objectification.
    Flamm, Matthew Caleb.
  • Santayana's Critique of Modern Philosophy and Its Application to the Work of Nietzsche
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    Subject Headings:
    • Santayana, George, 1863-1952.
    • Nietzsche, Friedrich Wilhelm, 1844-1900.
    • Philosophy, Modern.
    • Psychology and philosophy.
    Abstract:
      This article explores Santayana's critique of Modern philosophy and its connections with his views of Nietzsche. The aim is to highlight, primarily, the importance of Santayana's critique for contemporary philosophers working in the shadow of Nietzsche. The resounding view of Nietzsche is that he is an anti, and/or postmodern thinker. Santayana's critique interestingly challenges this view.

Reviews

    Misak, C. J. (Cheryl J.)
  • Democratic Hope: Pragmatism and the Politics of Truth (review)
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    Subject Headings:
    • Westbrook, Robert B. (Robert Brett), 1950- Democratic hope: pragmatism and the politics of truth.
    • Pragmatism.
    Almeder, Robert F.
  • Le doute en question: Parades pragmatistes au défi sceptique (review)
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    Subject Headings:
    • Tiercelin, Claudine. Doute en question: Parades pragmatistes au défi sceptique.
    • Belief and doubt.
    Kincaid, Shannon.
  • The Task of Criticism: Essays on Philosophy, History, and Community, and: The Active Life: Miller's Metaphysics of Democracy (review)
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    Subject Headings:
    • Miller, John William. Task of criticism: essays on philosophy, history, and community.
    • Fell, Joseph P., ed.
    • Colapietro, Vincent Michael, 1950-, ed.
    • McGandy, Michael J., ed.
    • McGandy, Michael J. Active life: Miller's metaphysics of democracy.
    • Philosophy.
    • Miller, John William.
    Howat, Andrew W.
  • Beyond Realism & Anti-Realism: John Dewey and the Neopragmatists (review)
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    Subject Headings:
    • Hildebrand, David L., 1964- Beyond realism and antirealism: John Dewey and the neopragmatists.
    • Pragmatism.
    McGandy, Michael J.
  • The Gleam of Light: Moral Perfectionism and Education in Dewey and Emerson (review)
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    Subject Headings:
    • Saito, Naoko. Gleam of light: moral perfectionism and education in Dewey and Emerson.
    • Dewey, John, 1859-1952.



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