Southeastern Geographer

Southeastern Geographer
Volume 45, Number 1, May 2005

CONTENTS

    Gares, Paul A.
    White, Stephen A.
  • Volumetric Analysis of Overwash Fans Resulting from Tropical Storms on North Hatteras Island, North Carolina
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    Subject Headings:
    • Washover fans -- North Carolina -- Hatteras Island.
    • Hurricane Dennis, 1999.
    • Hurricane Floyd, 1999.
    • Hurricane Irene, 1999.
    • Volumetric analysis.
    Abstract:
      In 1999, Hurricanes Dennis, Floyd, and Irene affected the North Carolina coastline. Although none of these storms made landfall north of Cape Hatteras, the northern Hatteras Island shoreline suffered severe beach erosion and widespread overwash. The volume of three overwash fans located within a 3.75 km section of shoreline in Rodanthe was determined by measuring depth of deposition at selected locations on the fans. Fan area was determined from measurements taken from aerial photographs. The depths of deposition on the fans ranged from 0.2-1.2m, and 30-50m3 per meter length of fan were deposited at the sites. The volumes deposited exceed the amounts recorded during previous storms at locations along the U.S. East Coast. Subaerial sedimentation on barrier islands depends on high magnitude/low frequency events because their higher storm surge and wave heights produce dune breaching. Overwash is not widespread during lower magnitude storms because the water levels are not high enough to result in flow across the barrier. The total volume of overwash on North Hatteras Island was estimated from fan areas measured on aerial photographs in conjunction with the average depth of deposition measured on the Rodanthe fans. The total amount of sediment deposited was estimated to be 48 m3 per meter of fan length. Comparing these overwash volumes to amounts deposited by wind on the barrier island north of Hatteras Island shows that, on an annual basis, overwash far exceeds wind as a mechanism for transferring sediment inland. However, an extrapolation over a longer period to accommodate for temporal variations reveals that the volumes of sediment transferred by overwash and by wind are nearly balanced.
    Keywords:
      Barrier island, overwash, hurricane
    Soulé, Peter T.
  • A Comparison of 30-yr Climatic Temperature Normals for the Southeastern United States
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    Subject Headings:
    • Climatic normals -- Southern States -- History.
    • Temperature -- History.
    • Climatic changes -- Southern States -- History.
    Abstract:
      Thirty-year climatic normals are an integral part of climate and climate assessment, but they are typically not used to address issues of climatic change. For 104 stations within the southeastern United States, I analyze spatial parameters of the two most recent 30-yr temperature normals (1961-1990, 1971-2000) to illustrate the utility of 30-yr normals for an assessment of climatic change. My comparison of the two normal periods shows that the Southeast as a whole has experienced a small (0.10°C) but significant increase in average temperature. However, of the seven physiographic provinces examined, only the lower Coastal Plain has experienced a significant increase in temperature. My analysis of urban versus rural sites produced mixed results on the potential impacts of urbanization and the associated heat island effects on the observed changes in temperature. While some long-term analyses of the thermal climate of the Southeast have shown the region to be cooling, my results suggest that the thermal climate of the southeastern United States since 1961 is stable or slightly warming.
    Keywords:
      climatic normals, temperature, southeastern U.S., climate change
    Ewing, Justin M.
    Vepraskas, Michael J.
    Zanner, C. William.
  • Using Historical Records of Land Use to Improve Wetland Mitigation
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    Subject Headings:
    • Wetland mitigation -- Carolina Bays.
    • Land use -- Carolina Bays -- Historiography.
    Abstract:
      Successful wetland mitigation is determined by goals and performance standards of a U.S. Army Corp of Engineers approved mitigation plan. This study collected and reviewed historical data for a mitigation site prior to construction to reduce the cost and risk of mitigation failure. Historical records were reviewed to evaluate the hydrology, vegetation, and soils of a drained Carolina bay wetland. Historical data were obtained from courthouse records, aerial photographs, personal interviews, the local Natural Resources Conservation Service, and the National Railroad Historical Society. Photographs and interviews indicated there was open water before drainage, suggesting a potential source of consistent hydrology. Organic soils subside when influenced by land clearance, drainage, and agricultural activities and could result in a water table above the soil surface once hydrology is restored. Aerial photographs show that several drainage systems have existed over the last 90 yr. Soils along the lines of the earlier drainage ditches and a former railroad line still show disturbance to depths of 1 m. These areas of disturbance could affect vegetation establishment. Records of agricultural practices suggest higher nutrient levels than those of undisturbed Carolina bays, indicating that undesired vegetation could compete with desired vegetation. Historical information verified that Juniper Bay is a viable restoration site and identified areas where design change could help improve chances for success. Similar historical reviews with other mitigation sites can help reduce cost and risk through evaluation of hydrology, soils, and vegetation.
    Keywords:
      wetland mitigation, Carolina bays, organic soils, historical records, subsidence
    Moseley, William G.
  • Regional Geographies of the U.S. Southeast and Sub-Saharan Africa: The Potential for Comparative Insights
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    Subject Headings:
    • Geography -- Southern States -- Methodology.
    • Geography -- Africa, Sub-Saharan -- Methodology.
    Abstract:
      This article outlines how the study of Sub-Saharan African regional geography has the potential to inform scholarship on the U.S. Southeast and vice versa. The author describes two approaches to comparative regional analysis and then provides an example of how each form of analysis may lead to interesting and productive intellectual crossfertilization. The first case is one of Africanist geographical scholarship informing southeastern U.S. studies that emphasizes actual historical linkages between the two regions. The second case is an example of how southeastern U.S. scholarship could potentially inform research in South Africa because of similar circumstances that the two regions hold in common. The article concludes by commenting on the two forms of comparative regional analysis.
    Keywords:
      Atlantic world, land reform, regional geography, southern Africa, U.S. Southeast
    Inwood, Joshua.
  • Making the Legal Visible: Wilhelmina Griffin Jones' Experience of Living in Alabama During Segregation
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    Subject Headings:
    • Jones, Wilhelmina Griffin.
    • African Americans -- Alabama -- Tuskegee -- Social conditions -- 20th century.
    • African American women -- Legal status, laws, etc. -- Alabama -- Tuskegee -- History -- 20th century.
    • Segregation -- Alabama -- Tuskegee.
    • Tuskegee (Ala.) -- Race relations -- History -- 20th century.
    Abstract:
      Using Delaney's conception of the legalized landscape, this paper seeks to understand the intersection of race and power in the everyday experiences of an African-American woman. Using Delaney's theory to understand the Jim Crow-era experiences of Wilhelmina Griffin Jones and her interaction with a white police officer offers clues about how the visible, legalized landscape and the metaphysical, conceptualized legalized landscape are manifest in the everyday realm. Furthermore, by asserting the importance of the everyday experiences of African Americans and whites during segregation, this paper comes to a more nuanced understanding of the ways in which resistance and power became enacted through these interactions.
    Keywords:
      Race, power, Jim Crow, De Certeau, resistance
    Davis, Edward H.
    Morgan, John T.
  • Collards in North Carolina
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    Subject Headings:
    • Collards -- North Carolina.
    Abstract:
      The collard plant has flourished as an important garden food crop in the U.S. South since the early nineteenth century because it is able to endure hot summers and still thrive in winter, when it is harvested and consumed as greens. The uneven geographic pattern of collard production in North Carolina calls into question claims that the collard is a ubiquitous Southern food crop. It is still the dominant winter garden crop on the North Carolina Coastal Plain, but fewer patches are being planted and consumption of collards is waning, especially among young people. Commercial collard production is increasing to satisfy the demand of older folk.
    Keywords:
      collards, gardens, food, North Carolina
    Leppman, Elizabeth J.
  • Appalachian Churchscapes: The Case of Menifee County, Kentucky
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    Subject Headings:
    • Church buildings -- Landscape architecture -- Kentucky -- Menifee County.
    • Christian sects -- Kentucky -- Menifee County.
    • Appalachian Region, Southern -- Religious life and customs.
    Abstract:
      Christian churches form part of the American cultural landscape, and their construction and reconstruction is a circular process. Belief, attitude, and intentionality (behavior) produce the churchscape, or church landscape, an icon, which in turn influences beliefs, attitudes, and intentionality in the next users. The features of this icon vary widely, but evangelical denominational churches, mission churches, and Appalachian Mountain churches tend to follow certain themes or styles. In Menifee County, Kentucky, Appalachian Mountain churches, which have been marginalized in the study of American religion, exist in close proximity to mainstream evangelical denominational and mission churches, exhibiting these contrasts within a small geographical area.
    Keywords:
      church landscapes, Appalachia, evangelical denominational churches, missions, Appalachian Mountain religion
    Whitelegg, Drew.
  • "Selling Lifestyles, not Homes": Growth and Politics in Forsyth County, Georgia
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    Subject Headings:
    • Cities and towns -- Georgia -- Forsyth County -- Growth.
    • Forsyth County (Ga.) -- Social conditions.
    • Forsyth County (Ga.) -- Economic conditions.
    • Housing -- Georgia -- Forsyth County.
    Abstract:
      Forsyth County, Georgia, was one of the fastest growing counties in the nation during the 1990s. This paper examines how it benefited from the general Atlanta boom yet grew through differentiating itself both from the central city and neighboring suburban counties. The irony of rapid development is that issues such as pollution and heavy traffic have made Forsyth's 'go-it-alone' attitude progressively more untenable, while the county is now increasingly indistinguishable from much of the rest of Atlanta. Framed within David Harvey's notion of structured coherence, this paper argues that Forsyth provides an excellent example of intra-urban competition amid the uneven development of a metropolitan region.
    Keywords:
      suburban growth, competition, uneven development
    Hurt, Douglas A.
  • Dialed In? Geographic Expansion and Regional Identity in NASCAR's Nextel Cup Series
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    Subject Headings:
    • NASCAR Nextel Cup Series.
    • Stock car racing -- Social aspects -- Southern States.
    • Regionalism and sports -- Southern States.
    Abstract:
      In recent years, NASCAR (National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing) has undertaken an aggressive campaign of geographic expansion. With the hopes of becoming a national sport, new races have been held in the Chicago, Dallas-Fort Worth, Kansas City, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, and Miami markets. While the traditional southeastern United States core continues to host the majority of races, some argue that expansion has resulted in a re-writing of stock car history and a decline of southern distinctiveness in the sport. Changing NASCAR Nextel (formerly Winston) Cup race locations, driver hometowns, and fan club membership will be considered as part of an attempt to assess the impact of NASCAR expansion upon southern regional identity.
    Keywords:
      NASCAR, South, geography ofsport, regional identity

Reviews

    Noll, Michael G.
  • Lots of Parking: Land Use in a Car Culture (review)
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    Subject Headings:
    • Jakle, John A. Lots of parking: land use in a car culture.
    • Sculle, Keith A.
    • Parking lots -- Landscape architecture.
    Black, Brian, 1966-
  • Extracting Appalachia: Images of the Consolidation Coal Company, 1910-1945 (review)
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    Subject Headings:
    • Buckley, Geoffrey L., 1965- Extracting Appalachia: images of the Consolidation Coal Company, 1910-1945.
    • Consolidation Coal Company -- History.
    Houser, Chris.
  • The Coastal Zone: Papers in Honor of H. Jesse Walker (review)
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    Subject Headings:
    • Davis, Donald W., 1943-, ed. Coastal zone: papers in honor of H. Jesse Walker.
    • Richardson, Miles, 1932-, ed.
    • Walker, H. J. (Harley Jesse), 1921-
    • Coasts.
    Frontani, Heidi Glaesel.
  • Critical Political Ecology: The Politics of Environmental Science (review)
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    Subject Headings:
    • Forsyth, Tim. Critical political ecology: the politics of environmental science.
    • Environmental policy.
    Murphy, James T.
  • Alternative Capitalisms: Geographies of Emerging Regions (review)
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    Subject Headings:
    • Gwynne, Robert N. Alternative capitalisms: geographies of emerging regions.
    • Klak, Thomas, 1957-
    • Shaw, Denis J. B.
    • Globalization -- Economic aspects.
    Algeo, Katie.
  • Appalachian Folkways (review)
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    Subject Headings:
    • Rehder, John B. Appalachian folkways.
    • Folklore -- Appalachian Region, Southern.
    Howard, Thomas Frederick, 1946-
  • Looking for Longleaf: The Fall and Rise of an American Forest (review)
    [Access article in PDF]
    Subject Headings:
    • Earley, Lawrence S. Looking for Longleaf: the fall and rise of an American forest.
    • Longleaf pine -- Southern States.
    Hallock, Thomas.
  • The Planting of New Virginia: Settlement and Landscape in the Shenandoah Valley (review)
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    Subject Headings:
    • Hofstra, Warren R., 1947- Planting of New Virginia: settlement and landscape in the Shenandoah Valley.
    • Shenandoah River Valley (Va. and W. Va.) -- Historical geography.

SEDAAG

    James, L. Allan.
  • Report of the Program Committee, 2004
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    Subject Headings:
    • Association of American Geographers. Southeastern Division. Meeting (59th : 2004 : Biloxi, Miss.)
    • Geography -- Southern States -- Congresses.
    Pyle, Lizbeth A.
  • Report of the Honors Committee, 2004
    [Access article in PDF]
    Subject Headings:
    • Association of American Geographers. Southeastern Division -- Awards.
    • Geography -- Southern States -- Awards.



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