We are unable to display your institutional affiliation without JavaScript turned on.
Browse Book and Journal Content on Project MUSE
OR

Volume 76, Number 4, Winter 2009

Table of Contents

The Religious-Secular Divide: The U.S. Case

Endangered Scholars Worldwide

pp. v-xi

Editor’s Introduction

pp. xiii-xiv

Part I. Origins of the Secular

Religion and the Earthly City

pp. 989-1000

Locke and the Politicai Origins of Secularism

pp. 1001-1034

The Secular-Religious Divide: Kant’s Legacy

pp. 1035-1048

The Secular and Secularisms

pp. 1049-1066

Part II. Religious Selves, Secular Selves

Introduction: Religious Selves, Secular Selves

pp. 1069-1071

Ritual, the Self, and Sincerity

pp. 1073-1096

Spirituality in Modern Society

pp. 1097-1120

The Human Predicament

pp. 1121-1140

Part III. Keynote Address

The Polysemy of the Secular

pp. 1143-1166

Part IV. Religion, Politics, and the Democratic State

Introduction: Odd Ways of Being Secular

pp. 1169-1172

The Secular Citadel and the Untended Garden

pp. 1173-1180

We Are All Religious Now. Again.

pp. 1181-1198

Jefferson’s Rickety Wall: Sacred and Secular in American Politics

pp. 1199-1226

Obama’s Neo-New Deal: Religion, Secularism, and Sex in Political Debates Now

pp. 1227-1254

Part V. Moral Crusades, Then and Now: Religious and Secular

Introduction: Moral Crusades Then and Now: Religious and Secular

pp. 1257-1260

Prophetic Religion: A Transracial Challenge to Modem Democracy

pp. 1261-1276

American Protestant Moralism and the Secular Imagination: From Temperance to the Moral Majority

pp. 1277-1306

The Culture War and the Sacred/Secular Divide: The Problem of Pluralism and Weak Hegemony

pp. 1307-1322

Part VI. Contemporary Debates: The Future of Religion and the Future of Secularism

Introduction: The Future of Religion and the Future of Secularism

p. 1325

The Religious-Secular Divide: The U.S. Case

pp. 1327-1332

Reclaiming the Secular and the Religious: The Primacy of Religious Autonomy

pp. 1333-1344

Religion, Secularism, and a Democratic Politics of “As If”

pp. 1345-1350

Contents: Volume 76: Nos 1-4

pp. 1351-1358

Index of Contributors

pp. 1359-1364

Notes on Contributors

pp. c3-c4

Research Areas

Recommend

  • You have access to this content
  • Free sample
  • Open Access
  • Restricted Access