Rhetoric & Public Affairs

Rhetoric & Public Affairs
Volume 7, Number 4, Winter 2004
Special Issue: Religious and Theological Traditions as Sources of Rhetorical Invention

CONTENTS

    Aune, James Arnt.
  • Justice and Argument in Judaism: A D'var Torah on Shofetim
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    Subject Headings:
    • Rhetoric -- Religious aspects -- Judaism.
    • Bible. O.T. Pentateuch -- Criticism, interpretation, etc., Jewish.
    • Capital punishment (Jewish law)
    Abstract:
      In the form of a commentary on passages from the Torah and the Talmud about the death penalty, this essay identifies unique characteristics of the Jewish concepts of justice and of argumentative dialogue. The Jewish concepts of justice and argument potentially serve as a useful corrective to some current efforts by conservative Protestants to bring religion into the public sphere.
    Bytwerk, Randall L.
  • A Calvinist and a Scholar
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    Subject Headings:
    • Rhetoric -- Religious aspects -- Calvinism.
    • National socialism -- Germany.
    • Communism.
    Abstract:
      How does a Calvinist scholar's religious conviction influence his scholarship? The Calvinist (or Reformed) approach to Christianity claims to be a worldview with implications for every area of human knowledge. This essay traces how that worldview may contribute to an understanding of National Socialist and Marxist-Leninist rhetoric.
    Campbell, John Angus.
  • On the Way to Canterbury: A Rhetorician's Tale
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    Subject Headings:
    • Rhetoric -- Religious aspects -- Christianity.
    • Rhetoric -- Religious aspects -- Church of England.
    Abstract:
      The essay locates the author's work in the comic perspectives of rhetoric and Christianity. To explain why no Christian motive has been found in his work, the author explores facets of Anglican Christianity that see theology and practical reason as complementary. The essay encourages religious scholars to integrate theological insight in their scholarship and draws on the recent work of Eugene Garver to argue that religious particularism may enrich civic argument by encouraging both candor and political friendship
    Casey, Michael W.
  • "Come Let Us Reason Together": The Heritage of the Churches of Christ as a Source for Rhetorical Invention
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    Subject Headings:
    • Rhetoric -- Religious aspects -- Churches of Christ.
    Abstract:
      Religion, the substance of culture, should impact another vital symbolic web of culture: rhetoric. Particular religious heritages should uniquely influence the rhetoric of individuals steeped within the culture of those traditions. The Churches of Christ, a group that values rhetoric, preaching, and public speaking, has emphasized reason, pragmatism, optimism, and restoration as rhetorical topoi. This essay illustrates these topoi in a diverse set of public figures impacted by this religious heritage.
    Farrell, James M.
  • Rhetoric and the Catholic Imagination
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    Subject Headings:
    • Rhetoric -- Religious aspects -- Catholic Church.
    Abstract:
      The Catholic imagination encourages a sacramental appreciation of a world that is full of grace. Catholics understand that each baptized person has a unique vocation to fulfill, a particular way in which he or she is invited to cooperate with God in bringing about His Kingdom. That is no less true for Catholic rhetoricians, who see in history and public controversy glimpses of God's plan for salvation, and who are called to respond to God's invitation by joyfully entering civic life sustained by church teaching drawn from the truth of scripture and tradition.
    Graves, Michael P., 1943-
  • One Friend's Journey
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    Subject Headings:
    • Knowledge, Theory of (Religion)
    • Inner Light.
    • Rhetoric -- Religious aspects -- Quakers.
    Abstract:
      This essay begins with the presentation of an abbreviated historical framework for one of the most enduring, significant, and widely held Quaker beliefs, that of inward, immediate, and direct revelation. This belief is charted with particular reference to significant writings by seventeenth-century Quaker leaders George Fox and Robert Barclay. Many contemporary Quakers believe that direct revelation, also known as "the Inward Light of Christ," is a primary source of knowledge, that it originally inspired and presently empowers the scriptures, that it is superior to reason alone, and that it discovers validation in the gathered Quaker meeting when it achieves consensus. Some of the implications of this experiential epistemological position are then illustrated with reference to two anecdotes drawn from the author's attempts to discover divine guidance in scholarly writing projects.
    Hariman, Robert.
  • Apologia Pro Curriculum Vitae
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    Subject Headings:
    • Rhetoric -- Religious aspects -- Presbyterian Church.
    Abstract:
      In response to the question of how my association with the Presbyterian church might influence my work, I supply 17 possible answers, some of which suggest points of departure for reflection on rhetorical studies.
    Huxman, Susan Schultz.
    Biesecker-Mast, Gerald, 1965-
  • In the World But Not of It: Mennonite Traditions as Resources for Rhetorical Invention
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    Subject Headings:
    • Rhetoric -- Religious aspects -- Mennonites.
    • Church and the world.
    Abstract:
      Because of their contrasting commitments to radical Christian discipleship and respectable national citizenship, Mennonites have historically employed a paradoxical rhetoric in order to articulate their convictions in the public sphere. This essay examines how Mennonites crafted separatist and assimilative arguments and martyr myths to transcend the polarizing positions of pacifism and patriotism. The essay concludes by describing how Mennonite traditions have influenced the authors' rhetorical scholarship and practice.
    Medhurst, Martin J.
  • Filled with the Spirit: Rhetorical Invention and the Pentecostal Tradition
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    Subject Headings:
    • Rhetoric -- Religious aspects -- Pentecostal churches.
    Abstract:
      This essay proceeds in three movements: a history of modern Pentecostalism, a personal narrative of my own experiences in a Pentecostal church, and an examination of five enthymemes, drawn from my Pentecostal experience, that continue to structure the way I think and write. These enthymemes are found to be guides to topic selection, critical practice, and intended audience response in my professional life as a rhetorical critic.
    Procter, David E.
  • For the Least Among Us: Articles of Faith of a United Methodist Rhetorician
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    Subject Headings:
    • Rhetoric -- Religious aspects -- Methodist Church.
    Abstract:
      Reflecting on both religious and rhetorical articles of faith offers insight into my view of the world. While I am ultimately unable to answer whether or not my secular work is guided by my United Methodist faith, it is clear that my professional work in rhetorical theory and criticism is consistent with my religious theology. The intersection of my religious and rhetorical beliefs do lead to questions of power, knowledge, social activism, and message orientation that serve as sources of rhetorical invention for my work.
    Reid, Robert Stephen.
  • Being Baptist
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    Subject Headings:
    • Rhetoric -- Religious aspects -- Baptists.
    Abstract:
      This essay examines the shape of a constitutive Baptist rhetoric in order to discover ways Baptist identity functions as a source of rhetorical invention. A Matrix of Contemporary Christian Voices is employed to array differences among Baptists in their expression of denominational identity and to discover limits as to what it means to think like a Baptist.
    Sullivan, Dale L.
  • Rhetorical Invention and Lutheran Doctrine?
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    Subject Headings:
    • Rhetoric -- Religious aspects -- Lutheran Church.
    • Lutheran Church -- Doctrines.
    Abstract:
      From a Lutheran perspective, rhetorical invention is the process by which a person determines how to take responsible action, understanding identity in terms of one's habitation in two kingdoms and in terms of one's role as an agent of grace and of law; grounding arguments in Scripture and subordinating reason to the Word; and responding sensitively in service to others.



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