Philosophy Psychiatry and Psychology

Philosophy, Psychiatry, & Psychology
Volume 9, Number 1, March 2002


Contents

Feature Article

    Ward, David E., 1940-
  • Explaining Evil Behavior: Using Kant and M. Scott Peck to Solve the Puzzle of Understanding the Moral Psychology of Evil People
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    Subject Headings:
    • Good and evil.
    • Kant, Immanuel, 1724-1804 -- Views on good and evil.
    • Peck, M. Scott (Morgan Scott), 1936- People of the lie.
    • Narcissism.
    Abstract:
      I assume that we find it hard to understand, for example, how a person could harm another person in cold blood. I then set out Kant's reason's for thinking that, strictly speaking, evil behavior is impossible: people may act on wicked desires but deliberate wrong-doing is not a genuine phenomenon. However, Kant's view is at odds with our common sense intuitions about morally evil behavior, namely, that such behavior is possible, albeit difficult to understand. I then suggest how Kant's analysis of the problem of evil behavior can help us to understand under what conditions evil behavior would be possible. Next, I introduce Peck's theory of how evil behavior can manifest itselfwhen a person suffers from malignant narcissism—a complaint that involves acting on principles which are not consciously acknowledged. I conclude that Kant's views on evil can be understood with reference to Peck's theory (and vice versa).
    Keywords:
      malignant, narcissism, morality, moral, evil, principle.

Commentary

    Sverdlik, Steven.
  • Unconscious Evil Principles
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    Subject Headings:
    • Ward, David E., 1940- Explaining evil behavior: using Kant and M. Scott Peck to solve the puzzle of understanding the moral psychology of evil people.
    • Good and evil.
    • Kant, Immanuel, 1724-1804 -- Views on good and evil.
    • Peck, M. Scott (Morgan Scott), 1936- People of the lie.
    • Narcissism.
    Adshead, Gwen.
  • Through a Glass Darkly: Commentary on Ward
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    Subject Headings:
    • Ward, David E., 1940- Explaining evil behavior: using Kant and M. Scott Peck to solve the puzzle of understanding the moral psychology of evil people.
    • Good and evil.
    • Kant, Immanuel, 1724-1804 -- Views on good and evil.
    • Peck, M. Scott (Morgan Scott), 1936- People of the lie.
    • Narcissism.
    Keywords:
      psychopathy, moral reasoning.
    Mullen, Paul E.
  • Moral Principles Don't Signify
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    Subject Headings:
    • Ward, David E., 1940- Explaining evil behavior: using Kant and M. Scott Peck to solve the puzzle of understanding the moral psychology of evil people.
    • Good and evil.
    • Narcissism.
    Ward, David E., 1940-
  • The Complexity of Evil Behavior
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    Subject Headings:
    • Sverdlik, Steven. Unconscious evil principles.
    • Adshead, Gwen. Through a glass darkly: commentary on Ward.
    • Mullen, Paul E. Moral principles don't signify.
    • Good and evil.

Feature Article

Commentary

    Campbell, John, 1956-
  • The Ownership of Thoughts
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    Subject Headings:
    • Coliva, Annalisa. Thought insertion and immunity to error through misidentification.
    • Thought insertion.
    • Self-knowledge, Theory of.
    Keywords:
      schizophrenia, thought insertion, immunity to error through misidentification.
    Coliva, Annalisa.
  • On What There Really Is to Our Notion of Ownership of a Thought
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    Subject Headings:
    • Campbell, John, 1956- Ownership of thoughts.
    • Thought insertion.
    • Self-knowledge, Theory of.

Feature Article

    Gerrans, Philip.
  • A One-Stage Explanation of the Cotard Delusion
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    Subject Headings:
    • Delusions.
    • Cognitive neuroscience.
    Abstract:
      Cognitive neuropsychiatry (CN) is the explanation of psychiatric disorder by the methods of cognitive neuropsychology. Within CN there are, broadly speaking, two approaches to delusion. The first uses a one-stage model, in which delusions are explained as rationalizations of anomalous experiences via reasoning strategies that are not, in themselves, abnormal. Two-stage models invoke additional hypotheses about abnormalities of reasoning. In this paper, I examine what appears to be a very strong argument, developed within CN, in favor of a two-stage explanation of the difference in content between the Capgras and Cotard delusions. That explanation treats them as alternative rationalizations of essentially the same phenomenology. I show, however, that once we distinguish the phenomenology (and the neuroetiology), a one-stage model is adequate. In the final section I make some more general remarks on the one- and two-stage models.
    Keywords:
      Cotard delusion, Capgras delusion, irrationality, cognitive neuropsychology, cognitive neuropsychiatry, psychopathology, face processing.

Commentary

    Young, Andrew W.
    De Pauw, Karel W.
  • One Stage Is Not Enough
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    Subject Headings:
    • Gerrans, Philip. One-stage explanation of the Cotard delusion.
    • Delusions.
    • Cognitive neuroscience.
    Keywords:
      delusions, Cotard delusion, Capgras delusion, cognitive neuropsychiatry.
    Gerrans, Philip.
  • Multiple Paths to Delusion
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    Subject Headings:
    • Young, Andrew W. One stage is not enough.
    • De Pauw, Karel W.
    • Phillips, James, 1938- Arguing from neuroscience in psychiatry.
    • Delusions.
    • Cognitive neuroscience.

Feature Article

    Gupta, Mona.
    Kay, L. Rex.
  • The Impact of "Phenomenology" on North American Psychiatric Assessment
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    Subject Headings:
    • Psychiatry -- North America.
    • Phenomenology.
    Abstract:
      North American psychiatric literature describes the current method of psychiatric diagnostic assessment as "phenomenological"; however, it is unclear what phenomenology means in this context. This paper investigates the meaning and impact of some of the major philosophical and psychiatric definitions of phenomenology on contemporary psychiatric assessment. Employing a comparative analysis of selected definitions of phenomenology, this paper argues that North American psychiatric assessment does not reflect any of these definitions of phenomenology. Instead, within the context of psychiatric assessment, phenomenology has taken on an idiosyncratic, clinical meaning of signs and symptoms. However, this does not mean that phenomenology has had no impact on North American psychiatry. This paper contends that phenomenology has made contributions to psychiatry, particularly in the area of psychotherapy and especially in self-psychological psychotherapy. The importance of the concept of empathy within psychotherapy is evidence of the continuing influence of philosophical phenomenology on psychiatry. This paper concludes that phenomenology can provide an important complementary perspective to the dominant methods of North American psychiatric practice.
    Keywords:
      empathy, Husserl, Jaspers, Kohut, psychotherapy, self-psychology.

Commentary

    Morley, James, 1957-
  • Phenomenological and Biological Psychiatry: Complementary or Mutual?
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    Subject Headings:
    • Gupta, Mona. Impact of "phenomenology" on North American psychiatric assessment.
    • Kay, L. Rex.
    • Psychiatry.
    • Phenomenology.
    Keywords:
      phenomenology, psychiatry, psychoanalysis, ontology.
    McMillan, John, 1968-
  • Jaspers and Defining Phenomenology
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    Subject Headings:
    • Gupta, Mona. Impact of "phenomenology" on North American psychiatric assessment.
    • Kay, L. Rex.
    • Phenomenology.
    • Jaspers, Karl, 1883-1969.
    Gupta, Mona.
    Kay, L. Rex.
  • Phenomenological Methods in Psychiatry: A Necessary First Step
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    Subject Headings:
    • Morley, James, 1957- Phenomenological and biological psychiatry: complementary or mutual?
    • McMillan, John, 1968- Jaspers and defining phenomenology.
    • Psychiatry -- North America.
    • Phenomenology.
    Keywords:
      behavior, empathy, human science, methodology, natural science, phenomenology.



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