Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal

Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 8.1, March 1998

Contributors

Contents

Articles

    Macklin, Ruth, 1938-.
  • Ethical Relativism in a Multicultural Society
    Subject Headings:
    • Ethical relativism.
    • Multiculturalism Social aspects.
    • Medical care -- United States.
    Abstract:
      The multicultural composition of the United States can pose problems for physicians and patients who come from diverse backgrounds. Although respect for cultural diversity mandates tolerance of the beliefs and practices of others, in some situations excessive tolerance can produce harm to patients. Careful analysis is needed to determine which values are culturally relative and which rest on an underlying universal ethical principle. A conception of justice as equality challenges the notion that it is always necessary to respect all of the beliefs and practices of every cultural group.
    Jansen, Lynn A.
  • Assessing Clinical Pragmatism
    Subject Headings:
    • Pragmatism.
    • Medical ethics.
    • Problem solving -- Religious aspects.
    Abstract:
      "Clinical pragmatism" is an important new method of moral problem solving in clinical practice. This method draws on the pragmatic philosophy of John Dewey and recommends an experimental approach to solving moral problems in clinical practice. Although the method may shed some light on how clinicians and their patients ought to interact when moral problems are at hand, it nonetheless is deficient in a number of respects. Clinical pragmatism fails to explain adequately how moral problems can be solved experimentally, it underestimates the relevance and importance of judgment in clinical ethics, and it presents a questionable account of the role that moral principles should play in moral problem solving.
    Fins, Joseph J.
    Miller, Franklin G.
    Bacchetta, Matthew D.
  • Clinical Pragmatism: Bridging Theory and Practice
    Subject Headings:
    • Pragmatism.
    • Jansen, Lynn A. Assessing clinical pragmatism.
    • Bioethics.
    Abstract:
      This response to Lynn Jansen's critique of clinical pragmatism concentrates on two themes: (1) contrasting approaches to moral epistemology and (2) the connection between theory and practice in clinical ethics. Particular attention is paid to the status of principles and the role of consensus, with some closing speculations on how Dewey might view the current state of bioethics.
    Gastmans, Chris
    Dierckx de Casterle, Bernadette
    Schotsmans, Paul, 1950-.
  • Nursing Considered as Moral Practice: A Philosophical-Ethical Interpretation of Nursing
    Subject Headings:
    • Nursing -- Philosophy.
    • Nursing ethics.
    • Medical care -- United States.
    Abstract:
      Discussions of ethical approaches in nursing have been much enlivened in recent years, for instance by new developments in the theory of care. Nevertheless, many ethical concepts in nursing still need to be clarified. The purpose of this contribution is to develop a fundamental ethical view on nursing care considered as moral practice. Three main components are analyzed more deeply--i.e., the caring relationship, caring behavior as the integration of virtue and expert activity, and "good care" as the ultimate goal of nursing practice. For the development of this philosophical-ethical interpretation of nursing, we have mainly drawn on the pioneering work of Anne Bishop and John Scudder, Alasdair MacIntyre, Lawrence Blum, and Louis Janssens. We will also show that the European philosophical background offers some original ideas for this endeavor.
    Taylor, Carol R.
  • Reflections on "Nursing Considered as Moral Practice"
    Subject Headings:
    • Gastmans, Chris. Nursing considered as moral practice.
    • Nursing ethics.
    • Nursing -- Philosophy.
    Abstract:
      This response to the preceding article by Gastmans, Dierckx de Casterle, and Schotsmans challenges the notion of "good care" as the ultimate goal of nursing practice, explores further the possible goals of nursing and how they may be identified, and presents six elements of professional caring along with their related virtues and moral obligations.

Scope Note 34




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