Journal of Scholarly Publishing

Journal of Scholarly Publishing
Volume 36, Number 4, July 2005

CONTENTS

    Greco, Albert N., 1945-
    Wharton, Robert M.
    Estelami, Hooman.
  • The Changing Market for University Press Books in the United States: 1997-2002
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    Subject Headings:
    • Book industries and trade -- United States.
    • University presses -- United States.
    • Scholarly publishing -- United States.
    Abstract:
      What was the market for university press books in the United States between 1997 and 2002? What impact did shifts in the general reader market and the creation of library electronic reserve capabilities have on university press net publishers' revenues? What impact did Internet bookselling sites have on new and used frontlist titles? The study reported here reviewed the published literature and statistical data sets. We detected (a) a significant shift in the traditional channels of distribution and (b) the emergence of a sophisticated used book market that undermined both frontlist and backlist sales. Based on a review of the empirical data, we present a series of recommendations for the university press community designed to capitalize on the inherent competitive advantages of university presses.
    Nederman, Cary J.
  • Herding Cats: The View from the Volume and Series Editor
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    Subject Headings:
    • Scholarly publishing -- United States.
    • Editing.
    • Essays.
    Abstract:
      I examine the status of the volume of collected research essays within scholarly publishing at the moment, focusing on various impediments to the publication of edited collections worthy of academic respectability. On the one hand, I argue that such books play a valuable role in the dissemination of knowledge, alongside journal articles and research monographs. But, on the other hand, I agree with some of the criticisms that have been levelled at edited collections by both academics and publishers. I attempt to offer some practical suggestions for redressing the problems, both perceived and real, that plague volumes of essays.
    Speck, Vicky H.
  • History Journals and the Online World: Some Findings from a Recent Survey and Some Observations
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    Subject Headings:
    • Scholarly electronic publishing -- United States.
    • History -- Periodicals.
    Abstract:
      The decision whether to go online may be critical to the survival of a history journal. In November 2004, ABC-CLIO surveyed over 1100 history journals to determine if they had made a decision to go online and what driving factors helped make that decision. The initial findings were presented at the annual meeting of the Conference of Historical Journals in January 2005.
    Donovan, S. K.
  • How to Alienate Your Editor: A Practical Guide for Established Authors
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    Subject Headings:
    • Academic writing.
    Abstract:
      Who submits the worst organized research papers? It is probably senior academics, who seem to forget with time the rules for successful submission learnt in their younger days, but who still manage to get published on the strength of their role and status within their chosen discipline. In at least some cases, it may even be a game, played by profligate authors to test an editor's patience, perhaps in revenge for some perceived slight of yesteryear. To those who play or want to play this game, called PIT*A, here is a summary of some classic moves.

The Transom

Index




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