High School Journal

The High School Journal
Volume 86, Number 3, February-March 2003


Articles

    Sokal, Laura.
    Smith, Donna G.
    Mowat, Heather.
  • Alternative Certification Teachers' Attitudes Toward Classroom Management
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    Subject Headings:
    • High school teachers -- United States -- Attitudes.
    • Classroom management -- United States.
    • High school teachers -- Certification -- United States.
    Cleveland, Darrell, 1968-
  • A Semester in the Life of Alternatively Certified Teachers: Implications for Alternative Routes to Teaching
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    Subject Headings:
    • High school teachers -- Certification -- North Carolina.
    • High school teachers -- Supply and demand -- North Carolina.
    • High school teachers -- Job satisfaction -- North Carolina.
    Wayman, Jeffrey C.
    Foster, Ann M.
    Mantle-Bromley, Corinne.
    Wilson, Carol Ann.
  • A Comparison of the Professional Concerns of Traditionally Prepared and Alternatively Licensed New Teachers
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    Subject Headings:
    • High school teachers -- Certification -- Colorado.
    • High school teaching -- Colorado.
    • Education, Higher -- Aims and objectives -- Colorado.
    Jorissen, Kathleen Topolka.
  • Successful Career Transitions: Lessons from Urban Alternate Route Teachers Who Stayed
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    Subject Headings:
    • High school teachers -- Job satisfaction -- Middle West.
    • Teacher mobility-- Middle West.
    • High school teachers -- Certification -- Middle West.
    Abstract:
      Mindful of the current difficulty and challenge in retaining new teachers, particularly in urban schools, this study examines data from a 1997 qualitative investigation of 6 Black sixth-year teachers in 2 Midwestern urban school districts regarding their views of their alternate route preparation program. The findings indicate that the program assisted them in successfully making a transition from other careers into teaching. Program structures and relationships that enabled the teachers to develop competence and identity included effective instruction in content and pedagogy and the development of close professional relationships with their mentors and with other members of their cohort. The findings imply the importance of addressing the developmental needs of individuals undertaking career transitions into teaching.



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