Hesperia

Hesperia
Volume 74, Number 4, October-December 2005

CONTENTS

    Thomas, Patrick Michael.
  • A Deposit of Late Helladic IIIB1 Pottery from Tsoungiza
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    Subject Headings:
    • Nemea Site (Greece)
    • Pottery, Mycenaean -- Greece -- Nemea Site.
    • Excavations (Archaeology) -- Greece -- Nemea Site.
    Abstract:
      This article presents the pottery and figurines recovered from a Mycenaean rubbish pit excavated by the Nemea Valley Archaeological Project at Tsoungiza in 1984–1985. The deposit appears to preserve a complete range of vessels used for personal consumption, serving, cooking, storage, and other household activities, with nearly all diagnostic sherds dating to Late Helladic IIIB1. Analysis of this material suggests that, despite variations in the frequencies of some closed vessels and kraters, the residents of this small Mycenaean community had access to the same range of ceramics in use at the palace centers. The production and distribution of much Mycenaean pottery therefore may not have been controlled directly by the palaces.
    Pfaff, Christopher A.
  • Capital C from the Argive Heraion
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    Subject Headings:
    • Temple of Hera (Argos, Greece)
    • Roman capitals (Lettering) -- Greece -- Argos.
    • Architecture -- Greece -- Argos.
    Abstract:
      A Doric column capital from the Argive Heraion, capital C, has been widely regarded as belonging to a very early (7th– or early–6th–century B.C.) stage in the development of the Doric capital. The author argues here from technical evidence that the capital instead dates to the Roman period and that it was created as a replacement element for a repair to the 6th–century B.C. North Stoa.
    Romano, David Gilman, 1946-
  • A Roman Circus in Corinth
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    Subject Headings:
    • Corinth (Greece) -- Antiquities, Roman.
    • Stadiums -- Greece -- Corinth.
    • Excavations (Archaeology) -- Greece -- Corinth.
    Abstract:
      During the 1967–1968 excavations of the Gymnasium area in Corinth, a long and narrow structure (the "Apsidal Building") was discovered. It is argued here that the structure represents the eastern meta and a portion of the spina of a circus, where chariot races were held. The circus appears to have been planned as an integral component of the Caesarian design of the city, constructed during the Augustan period, renovated in the late 1st century A.D., and refurbished as late as the 6th century. Furthermore, the circus was often the site of the equestrian contests of the Corinthian Caesarea festival and at times of the Panhellenic Isthmian Games.
  • Recently Published
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    Subject Headings:
    • Zarinebaf, F. (Fariba), 1959- Historical and economic geography of Ottoman Greece: the southwestern Morea in the 18th century.
    • Bennet, John, 1957-
    • Davis, Jack L.
    • Shaw, Joseph W. Kommos: a Minoan harbor town and Greek sanctuary in southern Crete.



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