Geographical Analysis

Geographical Analysis
Volume 36, Number 1, January 2004

CONTENTS

Articles

    Franklin, Rachel S.
    Plane, David.
  • A Shift-Share Method for the Analysis of Regional Fertility Change: An Application to the Decline in Childbearing in Italy, 1952-1991
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    Subject Headings:
    • Fertility, Human -- Italy -- Statistics.
    • Fertility, Human -- Statistics.
    • Shift-share analysis.
    Abstract:
      This paper applies shift-share analysis, a tool often used in economic geography and regional science, to regional fertility change in Italy, 1952-1991. During this post-World War II period, Italian fertility declined by over 33 percent, but the decline varied widely from region to region. Moreover, the demographic originations of the decline in births are not fully understood. Using birth data for nineteen Italian regions, this analysis is able to break regional change in births into three main components: a national effect, a cohort effect, and a regional differential effect, which in turn provide insight into the roots of fertility change at the regional level. These three components of change are then further disaggregated to account for the differences between changes due to population change and those related to actual changes in birth rates (the number of children produced by each woman). Strong regional differences between the north and south of Italy are demonstrated.
    Newbold, K. Bruce, 1964-
  • Segmented Paths and the Differential Role of Primate Immigrant Centers
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    Subject Headings:
    • United States -- Emigration and immigration.
    • Americanization.
    • Migration, Internal -- United States.
    Abstract:
      New York, Los Angeles, and Miami are primate immigrant centers within the U.S. metropolitan system, attracting new immigrant arrivals as well as serving as focal points for internal migrants. Using the segmented assimilation framework as a foundation, this paper emphasizes the role of geography and migration within the assimilation process. Focusing upon selected origin groups, migrant selectivity and the determinants of migration are evaluated and compared, highlighting the differential role of primate centers. While the New York and Miami metropolitan centers clearly dominate Dominican and Cuban migration systems respectively, the role of primate centers is less clear among other national origin groups.
    Rogers, Andrei.
    Jordan, Lisa.
  • Estimating Migration Flows from Birthplace-Specific Population Stocks of Infants
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    Subject Headings:
    • Migration, Internal -- Statistical methods.
    • United States -- Population -- Statistics.
    Abstract:
      When adequate data on migration are unavailable, demographers infer such data indirectly, usually by turning to residual methods of estimating net migration. This paper sets out and illustrates an inferential method that uses population totals in the first age group of birthplace-specific counts of residents in each region of a multiregional system to indirectly infer the entire age schedule of directional age-specific migration flows. Specifically, it uses an estimate of infant migration that is afforded by a count of infants enumerated in a region other than their region of birth to infer all other age-specific migration flows. Since infants migrate with their parents, the migration propensities of both are correlated, and the general stability of the age profiles of migration schedules then allows the association to be extended to all other age groups.
    Clark, W. A. V. (William A. V.)
    Huang, Youqin.
  • Black and White Commuting Behavior in a Large Southern City: Evidence from Atlanta
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    Subject Headings:
    • Commuting -- Social aspects -- Georgia -- Atlanta.
    • Housing -- Georgia -- Atlanta.
    • Commuting -- Statistics.
    Abstract:
      Previous research has shown that households are sensitive to commuting distance. In particular, households beyond a threshold distance move closer to the job when they change residence. The questions that motivate this paper are: how does race affect the probability of moving closer to the job when households change residence, and is there a trade off between commuting distance and neighborhood composition? Using a specialized data set the research shows that the commuting behaviors of minority and white households are consistent with the overall hypothesis that households minimize their commuting distance whenever possible. The research also shows that there is a tendency for both white and black households to choose slightly more integrated settings after changing residences. Yet, black households have to juggle the trade-off between neighborhoods with high socioeconomic status and commute distance and those who choose higher socioeconomic status neighborhoods have longer commutes.
    Benguigui, Lucien-Gilles, 1936-
    Czamanski, Daniel.
  • Simulation Analysis of the Fractality of Cities
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    Subject Headings:
    • Cities and towns -- Growth -- Mathematical models.
    • Tel Aviv (Israel) -- Geography.
    • Fractals.
    Abstract:
      Fractality in cities implies that a city possesses a similar structure at several different scales. Its existence is of great significance because it suggests the presence of some hidden process that operates at different urban scales and generates similarity. Recently, we studied the Tel Aviv metropolis at the levels of the entire metropolis and of one of its constituent towns. We concluded that the apparent growth mechanism (called leapfrogging) operates at these two levels. We hypothesized that since it appears at several levels, growth by leapfrogging may be one the fundamental processes that generates urban fractality. In this paper we present results of simulations used to verify this assumption in the case of randomly generated structures.

Erratum

    Arentze, Theo.
  • Erratum to "Measuring Impacts of Condition Variables in Rule-Based Models of Space-Time Choice Behavior: Method and Empirical Illustration." Geographical Analysis 35, Number 1 (January 2003) 2445
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