The Emily Dickinson Journal

The Emily Dickinson Journal
Volume 13, Number 2, Fall 2004

CONTENTS

Editor's Note

    Hutchison, Coleman.
  • "Eastern Exiles": Dickinson, Whiggery and War
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    Subject Headings:
    • Dickinson, Edward, 1803-1874 -- Political and social views.
    • Whig Party (U.S.)
    • Dickinson, Emily, 1830-1886 -- Criticism and interpretation.
    • United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Literature and the war.
    Abstract:
      This essay argues for the centrality of the rise and fall of the American Whig party to Emily Dickinson's poetic projects. Though careful not to conflate their individual political investments, the essay charts relationships between Edward Dickinson's "public" life and Emily Dickinson's "private" life, arguing that we cannot understand either Edward or Emily Dickinson outside of the context of latter day Whig party politics. In so doing, the essay urges Dickinson studies to reconsider and reconceptualize the poet's complex relationship to her immediate political milieu, and, in turn, the relationship of that immediate political milieu to the American Civil War.
    Kohler, Michelle.
  • Dickinson's Embodied Eyeball: Transcendentalism and the Scope of Vision
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    Subject Headings:
    • Dickinson, Emily, 1830-1886 -- Criticism and interpretation.
    • Emerson, Ralph Waldo, 1803-1882 -- Criticism and interpretation.
    • Vision in literature.
    Abstract:
      Dickinson's private, embodied treatment of poetic "vision" challenges other contemporary characterizations of the figural link between eyesight and poetry at a time when rhetorical connections among the material American continent, vision, and poetry were fundamental components of the nation's burgeoning literary discourse. Her poems that focus on vision and visual metaphors assert a disjunction between the insular vision of lyric poetry and the poetic vision endorsed by writers like Emerson who equated poetry with public meaning and place. An examination of this disjunction in four poems reveals in particular Dickinson's critique of the grammar and metaphors associated with vision in Emerson's Transcendentalist account of nature.
    Quinn, Carol.
  • Dickinson, Telegraphy, and the Aurora Borealis
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    Subject Headings:
    • Dickinson, Emily, 1830-1886 -- Criticism and interpretation.
    • Auroras in literature.
    Abstract:
      Between 1835 and 1860, New England was subject to unusually frequent and intense displays of the northern lights, which both excited religious fervor and interfered with the new technology of telegraphy. This essay examines Dickinson's treatment of the aurora borealis in her poetry, with particular attention paid to the astronomical and meteorological conditions of her youth, the poet's scientific reading, telegraphy, and the development of the Dickinsonian metonymy of "Aurora" as a response to the temporal and spatial limitations of human contact.
    Strickland, Georgiana.
  • Emily Dickinson's Philadelphia
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    Subject Headings:
    • Dickinson, Emily, 1830-1886 -- Travel -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia.
    • Philadelphia (Pa.) -- Description and travel.
    Abstract:
      In late winter 1855, Emily Dickinson and her sister, Lavinia, spent two or more weeks in Philadelphia visiting their second cousin, Eliza Coleman, and her parents. No letter from her describing their activities there has survived. This paper attempts to fill that void by examining Philadelphia's physical, social, intellectual, and cultural character at the time of their visit. Also considered are questions relating to Dickinson's friendship with Eliza Coleman and the origins of her longtime correspondence with the Reverend Charles Wadsworth of Philadelphia's Arch Street Presbyterian Church. The aim is to suggest how the trip may have influenced the poet's subsequent life and work.

Books Reviews

    Morris, Timothy, 1959-
  • A Historical Guide to Emily Dickinson (review)
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    Subject Headings:
    • Pollak, Vivian R., ed. Historical guide to Emily Dickinson.
    • Dickinson, Emily, 1830-1886 -- Criticism and interpretation.
    Schiff, Sarah Eden.
  • The Gardens of Emily Dickinson (review)
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    Subject Headings:
    • Farr, Judith. Gardens of Emily Dickinson.
    • Carter, Louise.
    • Dickinson, Emily, 1830-1886 -- Knowledge -- Gardening.

Contributors




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