Demography

Demography 39.3, August 2002

Contents

    Sigle-Rushton, Wendy.
    McLanahan, Sara.
  • The Living Arrangements of New Unmarried Mothers
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    Subject Headings:
    • Unmarried mothers -- United States -- Family relationships.
    • Housing -- United States.
    • Unmarried couples -- United States.
    Abstract:
      We use data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study to describe the living arrangements of new, unwed mothers and to examine the selection process that underlies choices of living arrangements. Our analysis goes beyond previous studies by examining a wide diversity of living arrangements for a homogenous sample of recent unwed mothers and by using information on both parents' demographic and human capital characteristics and the quality of their relationships. We find that about half the new unwed mothers are cohabiting at the time their children are born, and only 17% are living alone. We also find that mothers' choices of living arrangements are significantly related to parents' human capital, the quality of their relationship, and the cost of housing.
    Jepsen, Lisa K. (Lisa Kay), 1966-
    Jepsen, Christopher.
  • An Empirical Analysis of the Matching Patterns of Same-Sex and Opposite-Sex Couples
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    Subject Headings:
    • Unmarried couples -- United States.
    • Married people -- United States.
    • Gay couples -- United States.
    • Mate selection -- United States.
    Abstract:
      We used 1990 Census data to compare the matching behaviors of four types of cohabiting couples: same-sex male couples, same-sex female couples, opposite-sex unmarried couples, and married couples. In general, we found evidence of positive assortative mating for all traits and across all types of couples. The positive assortative mating, however, is stronger for non-labor- market traits (e.g., age, education) than for labor-market traits (e.g., hourly earnings). Further, members of married couples are more alike with respect to most characteristics than are members of opposite-sex cohabiting couples, and members of opposite-sex cohabiting couples are more alike than are members of same-sex couples.
    Baughman, Reagan.
    Dickert-Conlin, Stacy.
    Houser, Scott.
  • How Well Can We Track Cohabitation Using the SIPP? A Consideration of Direct and Inferred Measures
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    Subject Headings:
    • Unmarried couples -- United States.
    • Household surveys -- United States.
    Abstract:
      Cohabitation is an alternative to marriage and to living independently for an increasing number of Americans. Still, research that explores links between living arrangements and economic behavior is limited by a lack of data that explicitly identify cohabiting couples. To aid researchers in using the Survey of Income and Program Participation's (SIPP) rich data to explore cohabitation issues, we consider direct and inferred measures of cohabitation. We find, first, that the use of inferred definitions (relative to direct measures) in the SIPP is likely to yield higher cohabitation rates in the United States by incorrectly coding roommates as cohabitors. Second, the SIPP (whether by direct or inferred measures) counts a significantly larger number of cohabiting couples than the widely used Current Population Survey (CPS). Third, spells of cohabitation occur less frequently and last longer when a direct measure of cohabitation is used than when either of the two inferred measures of cohabitation is used; ours is the first article to reveal this result.
    Alba, Richard D.
    Logan, John.
    Lutz, Amy.
    Stults, Brian.
  • Only English by the Third Generation? Loss and Preservation of the Mother Tongue Among the Grandchildren of Contemporary Immigrants
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    Subject Headings:
    • Immigrant children -- United States -- Language.
    • English language -- Social aspects -- United States.
    • Bilingualism -- United States.
    Abstract:
      We investigate whether a three-generation model of linguistic assimilation, known from previous waves of immigration, can be applied to the descendants of contemporary immigrant groups. Using the 5% Integrated Public Use Microdata Sample 1990 file, we examine the home languages of second- and third-generation children and compare the degree of their language shift against that among the descendants of European immigrants, as evidenced in the 1940 and 1970 censuses. Overall, the rates of speaking only English for a number of contemporary groups suggest that Anglicization is occurring at roughly the same pace for Asians as it did for Europeans, but is slower among the descendants of Spanish speakers. Multivariate models for three critical groups--Chinese, Cubans, and Mexicans--indicate that the home languages of third-generation children are most affected by factors, such as intermarriage, that determine the languages spoken by adults and by the communal context.
    Duleep, Harriet Orcutt.
    Dowhan, Daniel J.
  • Insights from Longitudinal Data on the Earnings Growth of U.S. Foreign-Born Men
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    Subject Headings:
    • Immigrants -- United States -- Economic conditions -- Longitudinal studies.
    • Income -- United States -- Longitudinal studies.
    Abstract:
      Does the growth in earnings of foreign-born men exceed that of U.S. natives? We use longitudinal data on earnings from a Social Security Administration (SSA) database matched to the 1994 March Current Population Survey to shed new light on this important issue. We also examine the trend over time in the foreign-born men's earnings growth and illuminate the various ways that SSA data can be used to explore the earnings patterns of immigrants.
    Mouw, Ted.
  • Are Black Workers Missing the Connection? The Effect of Spatial Distance and Employee Referrals on Interfirm Racial Segregation
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    Subject Headings:
    • Discrimination in employment -- United States.
    • African Americans -- Employment.
    • Spatial analysis (Statistics)
    Abstract:
      I use data on the hiring practices and spatial location of firms in four cities to model the process of interfirm racial segregation. When I control for the spatial location of the firm, the use of employee referrals reduced the probability of hiring a black worker by 75% in firms that are less than 10% black. Among all firms, the results suggest that employee referrals are just as important as the geographic location of the firm in generating employment segregation: both increase the predicted level of interfirm racial segregation among blue-collar workers in the cities studied by about 10%.
    Lauderdale, Diane S.
    Kestenbaum, Bert.
  • Mortality Rates of Elderly Asian American Populations Based on Medicare and Social Security Data
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    Subject Headings:
    • Aged -- United States -- Mortality.
    • Asian Americans -- Mortality.
    • Mortality -- United States -- Statistics.
    Abstract:
      We present sex- and age-specific death probabilities for the elderly of six Asian American subgroups--Chinese, Filipino, Indian, Japanese, Korean, and Vietnamese-- based on data from Social Security Administration files. We determined ethnicity by combining race, place of birth, surname, and given name. The data source and ethnic determination are the same for deaths and the population at risk, avoiding the problem of noncomparability present when data for the numerator come from vital records and data for the denominator come from census records. We found that death rates for elderly Asian Americans are lower than those for whites, and that socioeconomic differences between subgroups do not translate into like differences in mortality.
    Burkhauser, Richard V.
    Daly, Mary C.
    Houtenville, Andrew J.
    Nargis, Nigar.
  • Self-Reported Work-Limitation Data: What They Can and Cannot Tell Us
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    Subject Headings:
    • Demographic surveys -- United States.
    • Health surveys -- United States.
    • People with disabilities -- Employment -- United States -- Statistics.
    Abstract:
      Despite their widespread use in the literature, the Current Population Survey (CPS) and similar surveys have come under attack of late. We put the criticisms in perspective by systematically examining what the CPS data can and cannot be used for in disability research compared to the National Health Interview Survey. On the basis of our findings, we argue (1) that the CPS can be used to monitor trends in outcomes of those with disabilities and (2) that the dramatic decline in the employment of people with disabilities we describe in the CPS during the 1990s is not an artifact of the data.
    Merli, M. Giovanna.
    Smith, Herbert L.
  • Has the Chinese Family Planning Program Been Successful in Changing Fertility Preferences?
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    Subject Headings:
    • Fertility, Human -- China.
    • Birth control -- China.
    • Family policy -- China.
    Abstract:
      Has China's strict one-child policy been successful in changing fertility preferences? Using linked data from surveys conducted in four counties of northern China in 1991 and 1994, we compare reproductive behavior against prior fertility preferences and show when and where women change from wanting to not wanting more children. The acceptance of policy-sanctioned family size follows a development gradient and reflects the degree of enforcement. High acceptance occurs in the most urban, industrialized county and in the county with the most rigid family planning policy. Acceptance is weaker among women living in the poorest county and in the county where enforcement is most lenient.
    Ratcliffe, Amy A.
    Hill, Allan G.
    Harrington, David P.
    Walraven, Gijs.
  • Reporting of Fertility Events by Men and Women in Rural Gambia
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    Subject Headings:
    • Fertility, Human -- Gambia.
    • Demographic surveys -- Gambia -- Sex differences.
    Abstract:
      We conducted a survey of male and female fertility in rural villages in The Gambia and compared men and women's reports of recent pregnancy events in the aggregate and of children ever born for matched couples. Despite widespread polygyny and sex differences in fertility, men's and women's reports were similar. Small sex differences in reports of recent stillbirths and neonatal deaths were found. For matched couples, husbands reported 0.23 more children ever born than their wives on average, but discordant reporting had little effect on recent marital fertility rates. Modeling of discordant reports indicates that fertility reports are more likely to be underestimated by both men and women for their earliest marriages. Reliable fertility data can be collected from men in this population.



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