American Journal of Philology

American Journal of Philology
Volume 126, Number 2 (Whole Number 502), Summer 2005

CONTENTS

Articles

    Turkeltaub, Daniel.
  • The Syntax and Semantics of Homeric Glowing Eyes: Iliad 1.200
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    Subject Headings:
    • Homer. Iliad. Book 1.
    • Eye in literature.
    • Achilles (Greek mythology)
    • Epic poetry, Greek.
    Abstract:
      An expanded version of the theory of traditional referentiality suggests that the ambiguous glowing eyes of Iliad 1.200 are Achilles', not Athena's. The image "glowing eyes" bifurcates into two syntactic groups, a verb group and an adjective group, with different connotations. The verb group is associated with enraged mortals; the adjective group, vision and the divine. This division suggests that the verbally glowing eyes in Iliad 1.200 belong to Achilles and express his fury. Yet, colored by the adjective group, they also imply Achilles' tragedy by indexing his vision, semi-divinity, and vitality at the moment when he seals his doom.
    Germany, Robert.
  • The Figure of Echo in the Homeric Hymn to Pan
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    Subject Headings:
    • Hymn to Pan.
    • Echo (Greek mythology)
    • Repetition in literature.
    • Psychoanalysis and literature.
    Abstract:
      This paper presents a literary reading of the Homeric Hymn to Pan, tracing the effects of phonetic, verbal, and thematic repetitions throughout the hymn and especially surrounding the appearance of Echo in line 21. A close reading of the structures generated by these repetitions reveals a complex superimposition of structural schemata, and a psychoanalytic reader-response analysis relates our deferred expectation for closure to Pan's disappointed desire for Echo in the erotic myth. The nightingale simile, in its allusion to the Odyssey, enacts another kind of echo and illustrates the self-conscious intertextuality of the archaic Greek poetics of variation.
    Mori, Anatole.
  • Jason's Reconciliation with Telamon: A Moral Exemplar in Apollonius' Argonautica (1.1286-1344)
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    Subject Headings:
    • Apollonius, Rhodius. Argonautica. Book 1.
    • Anger in literature.
    • Conduct of life in literature.
    • Epic poetry, Greek.
    • Literature and morals.
    Abstract:
      At the end of the first book of Apollonius' Argonautica, Telamon accuses Jason of plotting to leave Heracles behind, an insult for which Telamon later apologizes. This article suggests that their reconciliation unites the Alexandrian interest in what is appropriate for epic with Aristotelian views on anger and political friendship, two themes that resonate throughout the poem. While Telamon's apology and Jason's moderate response revise the structure of traditional epic quarrels, the portrayal of self-control in this episode constitutes a moral exemplar in keeping with those Homeric scenes that were admired by ancient philosophers.
    Wilcox, Amanda.
  • Sympathetic Rivals: Consolation in Cicero's Letters
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    Subject Headings:
    • Cicero, Marcus Tullius. Epistolae ad familiares.
    • Consolation in literature.
    • Consolation -- History.
    • Competition (Psychology) -- History.
    • Rhetoric, Ancient.
    Abstract:
      Both epistolary rhetoric and the practice of epistolography reflect the fact that competition for prestige was pervasive in Roman culture. Indeed, even Ciceronian letters of consolation, which a modern reader might expect to be exempt from social striving, are shaped by emulation and evaluation. Additionally, consolatory exchanges—letters of consolation preserved together with their replies—show that the challenges to a consolatory letter's bereaved addressee to meet or exceed a certain standard of behavior, and specifically to emulate the letter's author, were answered and challenged in turn.
    Bernstein, Neil W., 1973-
  • Mourning the Puer Delicatus: Status Inconsistency and the Ethical Value of Fostering in Statius, Silvae 2.1
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    Subject Headings:
    • Statius, P. Papinius (Publius Papinius) Silvae. Liber 2.
    • Bereavement in literature.
    • Social status in literature.
    • Adoption in literature.
    Abstract:
      In Silvae 2.1, Statius laments the premature death of the libertus Glaucias, the alumnus of Atedius Melior. This paper examines Statius' response to the rhetorical difficulties posed by Glaucias' status inconsistency and the ambiguous ethical value of fostering in the literary tradition. By presenting alternative models of status, Silvae 2.1 reflects the increasing social power of freedmen and their descendants. Through its representation of Melior's atypical response to orbitas (most attested adoptive and fostering relationships occurred between individuals of similar status), the poem also reflects contemporary demographic and social concerns.

Book Reviews

    Whitmarsh, Tim.
  • Melancholy, Love, and Time: Boundaries of the Self in Ancient Literature (review)
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    Subject Headings:
    • Toohey, Peter, 1951- Melancholy, love, and time: boundaries of the self in ancient literature.
    • Classical literature -- History and criticism.
    Antonaccio, Carla Maria.
  • The Locrian Maidens: Love and Death in Greek Italy (review)
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    Subject Headings:
    • Redfield, James M., 1935- Locrian maidens: love and death in Greek Italy.
    • Marriage -- Italy -- Locri Epizephyrii (Extinct city)
    Dalby, Andrew, 1947-
  • The Roman Banquet: Images of Conviviality (review)
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    Subject Headings:
    • Dunbabin, Katherine M. D. Roman banquet: images of conviviality.
    • Gastronomy -- Rome -- History.
    Rosati, Gianpiero, 1951-
  • Mail and Female: Epistolary Narrative and Desire in Ovid's Heroides (review)
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    Subject Headings:
    • Lindheim, Sara H. Mail and female: epistolary narrative and desire in Ovid's Heroides.
    • Ovid, 43 B.C.-17 or 18 A.D. Heroides.

Books Received




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