American Annals of the Deaf

American Annals of the Deaf
Volume 149, Number 4, Fall 2004

CONTENTS

Feature Articles

    Belcastro, Frank P.
  • Rural Gifted Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing: How Electronic Technology Can Help
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    Subject Headings:
    • Deaf -- Education -- United States.
    • Gifted children -- Education -- United States.
    • Rural children -- Education -- United States.
    • Distance education -- United States.
    Abstract:
      Electronic technology can be used to overcome many of the barriers and other factors that restrict delivery of services to rural schools; it can also expand the world of rural gifted students who are deaf or hard of hearing. Online college and high school Web sites that offer courses are listed, as well as a Web site for tutoring and one offering help for teachers of rural gifted students who are deaf or hard of hearing. Recommendations are made for ways that legislatures and rural school districts can make Internet resources and assistive technology more widely available in rural educational settings.
    Cawthon, Stephanie W.
  • Schools for the Deaf and the No Child Left Behind Act
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    Subject Headings:
    • United States. No Child Left Behind Act of 2001.
    • Deaf -- Education -- United States.
    • Educational accountability -- United States.
    Abstract:
      The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB) emphasizes educational accountability for all students. Twenty-eight states have policies to aggregate student participation and proficiency data for schools for the deaf in NCLB reports. The remaining states account for these students in other ways: referring student data to "sending" schools and aggregating data to the district or state level are most prominent. In reports of student assessment results for academic year 2002-2003, three schools for the deaf made "Adequate Yearly Progress" under NCLB: These schools demonstrated at least a 95% participation rate in assessments, and at least 95% of their students met or surpassed state proficiency benchmarks in reading and mathematics. Proficiency levels for other schools varied by report, but were often comparable to those of students with disabilities. Challenges and strategies for capturing the impact of NCLB accountability policies on deaf students are discussed.
    Luckner, John L.
    Velaski, Ann.
  • Healthy Families of Children Who Are Deaf
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    Subject Headings:
    • Deaf children -- United States -- Family relationships.
    • Family -- United States -- Psychological aspects.
    Abstract:
      Families provide the building blocks for the development of healthy, happy, competent children. The purpose of the present study was to identify and interview healthy families of children who were deaf. The researchers were interested in identifying factors that contribute to families' health as well as in collecting suggestions for other families with children who are deaf and for professionals in the field of deaf education. Nineteen families, all nominated by deaf education professionals, were interviewed. The interviews were transcribed and coded, and responses to each interview question were grouped under recurring themes. A summary of the results, limitations of the study, suggestions for future research, and recommendations for practice are provided.
    Mitchell, Ross E.
  • National Profile of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students in Special Education from Weighted Survey Results
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    Subject Headings:
    • Deaf children -- United States -- Statistics.
    Abstract:
      Data from the 1999-2000 Annual Survey of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Children and Youth (GRI Annual Survey; Gallaudet Research Institute, 2000) are systematically compared with those summarized by the U.S. Department of Education (2001, 2002) in the Annual Report to Congress on the Implementation of the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) to estimate the degree to which findings based on the GRI Annual Survey sample are likely to be representative of the population of deaf and hard of hearing children and youth served under IDEA. An appropriate weighting system is then applied to provide more nationally representative estimates of the characteristics of deaf and hard of hearing students served under IDEA and, more important, to provide a better national description of these students and the services they receive than would otherwise be available.
    Napier, Jemina.
  • Sign Language Interpreter Training, Testing, and Accreditation: An International Comparison
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    Subject Headings:
    • Interpreters for the deaf -- Training of -- United States.
    • Interpreters for the deaf -- Training of -- Australia.
    • Interpreters for the deaf -- Training of -- Great Britain.
    Abstract:
      The article explores sign language interpreter training, testing, and accreditation in three major English-speaking countries, Australia, the United Kingdom, and the United States, by providing an overview of the training and assessment of sign language interpreters in each country. The article highlights the reasons these countries can be considered leaders in the profession and compares similarities and differences among them. Key similarities include the provision of university interpreter training, approval for training courses, license "maintenance" systems, and educational interpreting guidelines. Differences are noted in relation to training prerequisites, types and levels of accreditation, administration of the testing system, and accreditation of deaf interpreters. The article concludes with predictions about future developments related to the establishment of the World Association of Sign Language Interpreters and the development of sign language interpreting research as a research discipline.
    Muñoz-Silva, Alicia.
    Sánchez-García, Manuel.
  • Maternal Distancing Strategies Toward Twin Sons, One With Mild Hearing Loss: A Case Study
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    Subject Headings:
    • Parent and child -- Spain -- Case studies.
    • Twins -- Spain -- Psychology -- Case studies.
    • Hearing impaired children -- Spain -- Case studies.
    Abstract:
      The authors apply descriptive and sequential analyses to a mother's distancing strategies toward her 3-year-old twin sons in puzzle assembly and book reading tasks. One boy had normal hearing and the other a mild hearing loss (threshold: 30 dB). The results show that the mother used more distancing behaviors with the son with a hearing loss, and thus gave greater encouragement to this son's cognitive development. These results differ from those of previous studies of deaf or hard of hearing children, whose participants generally had severe or profound hearing loss. In those studies, parents of deaf children used more low-level distancing than parents of normally hearing children. The results of the present study are discussed in terms of their implications for the parenting of twins and of children with mild hearing loss.

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