American Annals of the Deaf

American Annals of the Deaf
Volume 149, Number 1, Spring 2004

CONTENTS

Feature Articles

    Schirmer, Barbara R.
    Bailey, Jill.
    Lockman, Alison Schirmer.
  • What Verbal Protocols Reveal About the Reading Strategies of Deaf Students: A Replication Study
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    Subject Headings:
    • Reading (Elementary) -- United States -- Language experience approach.
    • Deaf children -- United States -- Psychology.
    • Cognitive learning -- United States.
    Abstract:
      Deaf students' reading strategies were identified by investigating these students' self-reported thinking during reading. In an earlier study (Schirmer, 2003), 10 elementary-level students attending a state school for the deaf had constructed meaning, monitored comprehension and activated strategies to improve comprehension, and evaluated comprehension, but had not demonstrated each of the reading strategies within these three overarching activities, all observed in previous studies of hearing skilled readers. Also, the students used a considerably greater variety of reading strategies for constructing meaning than for the other two activities. The replication study used the same procedure. Six elementary-level students attending a site-based public school classroom for deaf students thought aloud after reading each page of a short story. Analysis of these verbal reports indicated the participants performed similarly to those in the first study, thus supporting the reliability of results regarding reading strategies of readers who are deaf.
    Evans, Charlotte J.
  • Literacy Development in Deaf Students: Case Studies in Bilingual Teaching and Learning
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    Subject Headings:
    • American Sign Language -- Study and teaching (Elementary) -- Bilingual method.
    • Deaf children -- Education (Elementary) -- United States.
    Abstract:
      Abilingual model has been applied to educating deaf students who are learning American Sign Language (ASL) as their first language and written English as a second. Although Cummins's (1984) theory of second-language learning articulates how learners draw on one language to acquire another, implementing teaching practices based on this theory, particularly with deaf students, is a complex, confusing process. The purposes of the present study were to narrow the gap between theory and practice and to describe the teaching and learning strategies used by the teachers and parents of three elementary school children within a bilingual/bicultural learning environment for deaf students. The findings suggest that strategies such as using ASL as the language of instruction and making translation conceptual rather than literal contribute to literacy learning. Findings further indicate that some inconsistencies persist in applying a bilingual approach with deaf students.
    Punch, Renée.
    Hyde, Merv.
    Creed, Peter A.
  • Issues in the School-to-Work Transition of Hard of Hearing Adolescents
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    Subject Headings:
    • School-to-work transition -- Australia.
    • Deaf -- Employment -- Australia.
    • High school graduates -- Employment -- Australia.
    Abstract:
      Career theorists emphasize the importance of the development of career maturity in adolescents if they are to successfully negotiate the school-to-work transition. Transitions of deaf and hard of hearing adolescents may be especially problematic. The authors examine the implications of current labor market trends for young people, in particular those with hearing loss, and review data on employment outcomes for deaf and hard of hearing people. They discuss the environmental and attitudinal barriers that can influence the career outcomes of this population, consider the impact of hearing loss on adolescents' career maturity, and review the studies on this topic in the literature. The article focuses on the experiences of students with significant hearing loss who are educated in regular classes with the support of itinerant teachers, who communicate orally, and who may be defined as hard of hearing. Recommendations for research and practice are provided.
    Flaherty, Mary.
    Moran, Aidan P.
  • Deaf Signers Who Know Japanese Remember Words and Numbers More Effectively Than Deaf Signers Who Know English
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    Subject Headings:
    • Deaf -- Means of communication.
    • Japanese language -- Orthography and spelling.
    • English language -- Orthography and spelling.
    Abstract:
      Deaf people have difficulty reading and remembering English script because of its sound-based orthography. Logographs (e.g., kanji, Arabic numerals) should not pose the same challenge because they are based on meaning, not sound. Little research has been conducted to test this theory's validity cross-culturally. The present study was an attempt to do just that. The first of two experiments tested immediate memory spans for word sequences of 20 hearing Irish, 20 prelingually deaf Americans, 20 hearing Japanese, and 20 prelingually deaf Japanese. For English words, deaf participants showed shorter memory spans than hearing participants, but memory spans were similar for deaf and hearing participants for words in kanji, the logographic system for Japanese writing. The second experiment tested memory span for Arabic numerals, with the same participants. Deaf English-readers showed shorter memory spans than their hearing counterparts, but deaf and hearing Japanese performed similarly.
    Steffan, Richard Charles.
  • Navigating the Difficult Waters of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001: What It Means for Education of the Deaf
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    Subject Headings:
    • United States. No Child Left Behind Act of 2001.
    • Educational accountability -- Law and legislation -- United States.
    • Deaf children -- Education -- United States.
    Abstract:
      The author outlines the major elements of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 and describes the law's impact on deaf education. The law's stated purpose is to close the achievement gap with accountability, flexibility, and choice, so that no child is left behind. The specific goal of the law is to ensure that all students are 100% proficient in reading, mathematics, and science by 2014. No Child Left Behind has effected sweeping reforms in general education. But with 814 requirements, it has also created great stress in educators throughout the United States. No Child Left Behind poses particular challenges to education of the deaf since policymakers gave no consideration to the needs of deaf children in formulating this law. Clearly, deaf students must be included in school and state accountability systems, but the law leaves many questions unanswered.
    Marschark, Marc.
    Convertino, Carol.
    McEvoy, Cathy.
    Masteller, Allison.
  • Organization and Use of the Mental Lexicon by Deaf and Hearing Individuals
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    Subject Headings:
    • Categorization (Linguistics)
    • Cognitive learning -- United States.
    • Sign language acquisition -- United States.
    Abstract:
      Two experiments explored the taxonomic organization of mental lexicons in deaf and hearing college students. Experiment 1 used a single-word association task to examine relations between categories and their members. Results indicated that both groups' lexical knowledge is similar in terms of overall organization, with associations between category names and exemplars stronger for hearing students; only the deaf students showed asymmetrical exemplar-category relations. Experiment 2 used verbal analogies to explore the application of taxonomic knowledge in an academically relevant task. Significant differences between deaf and hearing students were obtained for six types of analogies, although deaf students who were better readers displayed response patterns more like hearing students'. Hearing students' responses reflected their lexical organization; deaf students' did not. These findings implicate the interaction of word knowledge, world knowledge, and literacy skills, emphasizing the need to adapt instructional methods to student knowledge in educational contexts.
    Kluwin, Thomas N.
    Morris, C. S.
    Clifford, Jesteene.
  • A Rapid Ethnography of Itinerant Teachers of the Deaf
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    Subject Headings:
    • Teachers of the deaf -- United States.
    • Deaf -- Education -- United States.
    Abstract:
      A rapid ethnographic study of 10 itinerant teachers in two school districts and 21 other professionals working with the itinerants was conducted. Rapid ethnography starts with the same assumptions about culture as conventional ethnography. However, it is not constrained by the assumption of cultural ignorance on the investigator's part. Thus, it enables better-directed data collection. Interviews with the itinerants and other professionals, direct observation of itinerants at work, and archival data permitted the authors to generate a list of themes reflecting results of other studies which focused on specific skills for itinerant teaching. While knowledge of specific skills cannot be ignored, the study shows that effective itinerants are ones who, through a personality trait, extensive experience, or a specific value system, can generate a positive composite image of their role as itinerants and are then able to interact on the basis of that image.

Departments

    Moores, Donald F.
  • Editorial: The Future of Education of Deaf Children: Implications of Population Projections
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    Subject Headings:
    • Johnston, Trevor A. W(h)ither the deaf community? population, genetics, and the future of Australian Sign Language.
    • Deaf children -- Education.



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