Features

  1. Moving Together in an Era of Assembly
  2. Alana Gerecke, Laura Levin
  3. pp. 5-10
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Spatial Politics of Assembly

  1. Dramas of Homemaking and Hospitality in ATSA's Cuisine ta ville
  2. Sunita Nigam
  3. pp. 11-18
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  1. Subverting Colonial Choreographies of Memory: Drag the Red and the March for Tina Fontaine
  2. Elan Marchinko
  3. pp. 19-25
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  1. Steel Trees, Fish Skins, and Futurity Cyphers
  2. Karyn Recollet
  3. pp. 26-30
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Everyday Choreographies

  1. Processions for Mother Earth: Scenes from a Flooded Summer
  2. Gabriel Levine
  3. pp. 31-36
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  1. Moving Together, 22 Ways
  2. Justine A. Chambers, Alana Gerecke
  3. pp. 37-40
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  1. Assembling Collaboration in the Debris Field: From Psychogeography to Choreographies of Assembly
  2. Mary Elizabeth Luka
  3. pp. 41-47
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  1. Choreographies of Crip and Mad Travel
  2. Lindsay Eales, Danielle Peers
  3. pp. 48-52
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Choreographies of Protest

  1. Choreo Graph | Women's Marches: A Photo-Assemblage
  2. Laura Levin
  3. pp. 53-55
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  1. Montreal's Maple Spring: The Afterlives of Movement Histories
  2. Stefanie Ellen Miller
  3. pp. 56-61
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  1. Black Lives Matter Toronto: Urgency as Choreographic Necessity
  2. Rodney Diverlus
  3. pp. 62-68
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  1. Some People Are Oil and Water
  2. Brynn Catherine McNab
  3. pp. 69-74
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Art, Festival, and Assembly

  1. Pop-Up Art and the Aesthetics of Assembly
  2. Shana MacDonald
  3. pp. 75-79
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  1. The Kinaesthetic Landscape of Toronto Caribbean Carnival: Transforming the Road into a Stage
  2. Jacqueline Taucar
  3. pp. 80-85
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  1. Your Timing Is Perfect and other wall works
  2. Jenn Goodwin
  3. pp. 86-90
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  1. Nocturnal Rhythms and Collective Practices
  2. Eleonora Diamanti
  3. pp. 91-95
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  1. Choreography for Audience—Take One
  2. Noémie Lafrance
  3. pp. 96-99
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Views and Reviews

  1. Editorial: Accessibility, Aesthetics, and Ethics
  2. Heather Davis-Fisch
  3. pp. 100-101
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  1. Integrating Accessibility and Aesthetics Onstage in Neworld Theatre's King Arthur's Night
  2. Megan Johnson
  3. pp. 102-106
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  1. Private Letters, Public Influence: A Review of A Man of Letters
  2. Lisa Aikman
  3. pp. 107-109
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  1. Toronto, English-Canada, and the 'ROC': Robert Lepage Onstage
  2. Claire Carolan
  3. pp. 110-111
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  1. The Strangers Within and Outside the Canadian Stage
  2. Jacqueline Taucar
  3. pp. 112-114
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  1. "A Multi-modal and Durational Praxis of Decolonization": Performance Studies in Canada
  2. Jen Harvie
  3. pp. 115-117
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Online Features

Pop-Up PechaKuchas
We offer a set of slideshow presentations that explore what is at stake in pop-up culture's imperative to gather together in public spaces. To reflect the hyper-temporality of the pop-up - or rather pop-up as a mechanism of assembly that is definitively structured by the anticipation of its own end - each slideshow is designed as a PechaKucha, a form that allows authors to show and describe 20 images, each for 20 seconds. https://ctr.utpjournals.press/ctr/176/slideshow11/14/

Home Away from Home: Temporary Dwellings for a Transient World
Taking home as a unifying theme that threads through a series of projects in various global sites, Jimena Ortuzar tracks and challenges the seeming contradiction inherent to the formulation of 'temporary dwellings.'

Everywhere and Somewhere: Performance After the End of Space
Matt Jones examines how pop-up performances have engaged with the collapse of space and time that characterizes the globalized terrain of the War on Terror - specifically the growing perception that "conflict takes place everywhere and somewhere."

"Deny Nothing": When Pop-Ups, Politics, and Parody Collide
Kimberley McLeod ponders the meeting of performance and the experience economy in the pop-up store fad. She looks at how comedian Nathan Fielder disrupts the consumerist scripting of encounters in pop-ups by staging an intentionally awkward choreography in his parodic Summit Ice shop.

Silenciosas Figuras: Mobile Heterotopia in Counter-Colonial Pop-Up Public Performance
Drawing together the stilt performances of Nemcatacoa Teatro and ARTICLE 11's public intervention work, Em Piro proposes the concept of "mobile heterotopia" as a way of understanding how pop-up events can serve to reorder and reimagine colonial spaces.

#TurnOnTheHearn: The Making of a (Temporary) Cultural Icon
Johanna Lawrie considers the Luminato Festival's temporary occupation of Toronto's abandoned Hearn Generating Station in an attempt to claim it as "world's largest multidisciplinary generator of art and culture." She asks what it meant to gather audiences to engage with impermanence and the paradoxes of this fleeting inhabitation.