restricted access   Volume 2, Number 1, Spring 2014

Table of Contents

Pleasure Reading

p. 1
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Seeing the Rebel: Or, How to Do Things with Dictionaries in Nineteenth-Century America

pp. 2-13
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Most Pleasurable Reading We’re Not Doing: Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women

pp. 13-24
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“Bartleby,” Empson, and Pastoral Pleasures

pp. 24-33
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Lost Books and a History of Reading Them

pp. 33-41
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Life during War time

pp. 41-52
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Essays

“Her Little Maid Mandy”: The Abolitionist Slave Owner and the Rhetoric of Affection in the Life and Early Fiction of E. D. E. N. Southworth

pp. 53-82
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Simultaneity- across- Borders: Richard Henry Dana Jr., Alexander von Humboldt, Edgar Allan Poe

pp. 83-106
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Knowing as Neighboring: Approaching Thoreau’s Kalendar

pp. 107-129
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Forum Indigeneity's Difference: Methodology and the Structures of Sovereignty

Introduction

pp. 131-136
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Sovereignty’s Challenge to Native American (and United States) History

pp. 137-142
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Counter-sovereignty

pp. 142-148
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Colonialism, Constituent Power, and Popular Sovereignty

pp. 148-153
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Forum Evidence and the Archive

Introduction: The Aesthetics of Archival Evidence

pp. 155-162
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Falsifiability, Confirmation Bias, and Textual Promiscuity

pp. 162-171
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Against Accumulation

pp. 172-179
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Accounting for Textual Remains

pp. 179-186
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Where the Evidence Is: Or, Willie Sutton Visits the Library

pp. 186-194
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Contributor Biographies

pp. 195-198
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