Volume 12, Number 2-3, January-April 2000

Table of Contents

Reconsidering the Rise of the Novel

  Introduction

pp. 141-146
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  Flat-Footed and Fly-Blown: The Realities of Realism

pp. 147-166
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  "A Matter Discutable": The Rise of the Novel

pp. 167-184
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  Two or Three Things I Know about Setting

pp. 185-192
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  The Man Who Came to Dinner: Ian Watt and the Theory of Formal Realism

pp. 193-212
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  A Question of Beginnings

pp. 213-226
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  Serious Reflections on Daniel Defoe (with an Excursus on the Farther Adventures of Ian Watt and Two Notes on the Present State of Literary Studies)

pp. 227-238
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  Gendered Cultural Criticism and the Rise of the Novel: The Case of Defoe

pp. 239-252
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  Watt's Rise of the Novel within the Tradition of the Rise of the Novel

pp. 253-276
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  Did You Say Middle Class?: The Question of Taste and the Rise of the Novel

pp. 277-308
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  Mary Davys's "Probable Feign'd Stories" and Critical Shibboleths about "The Rise of the Novel"

pp. 309-326
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  Ideas and Voices: The New Novel in Eighteenth-Century England

pp. 327-344
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  Personal Effects and Sentimental Fictions

pp. 345-368
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  Personal Identity, Narrative, and History: The Female Quixote and Redgauntlet

pp. 369-390
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  Staging Readers Reading

pp. 391-416
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  Fatal Fluency: Behn's Fiction and the Restoration Letter

pp. 417-434
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  Shandyism, Or, the Novel in Its Assy Shape: African Apuleius, The Golden Ass, and Prose Fiction

pp. 435-457
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  The New Model Eighteenth-Century Novel

pp. 459-478
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  Reconsidering Origins: How Novel Are Theories of the Novel?

pp. 479-499
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  Contributors

pp. v-vi
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