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Colorful maps located opportunities available to vacationers, including this pictorial map of Minnesota, circa 1935. courtesy of the minnesota historical society. Postcard of Keweenaw Land of Michigan’s Copper Country, 1943. courtesy of the michigan technological university archives and copper country historical collections. In 1928, President Calvin Coolidge spent the summer fishing on the Brule River, using a high school in Superior, Wisconsin, as the vacation White House. This stamp was likely issued by the Outdoor Club of Wisconsin to promote northern Wisconsin tourism. courtesy of the wisconsin historical society, whs image id 44768. Postwar Keweenaw promotional materials highlighted scenery and industry, including these images of the Club House Gardens at Keweenaw Park Resort and the Ahmeek 3 and 4 shaftrockhouse . courtesy of the michigan technological university archives and copper country historical collections. Postcards promoted a sense of adventure on North Woods canoe trips, circa 1942. courtesy of the minnesota historical society. Bill Rom’s Canoe Country Outfitters, 629 East Sheridan Street, Ely, circa 1958. courtesy of the minnesota historical society. This cover from a 1932 Wisconsin tourist pamphlet captures a typical North Woods scene. courtesy of the wisconsin historical society, whs image id 37918. Postwar roadside sign erected by the Copper Country Vacationist League promoting the area’s health benefits. courtesy of the michigan technological university archives and copper country historical collections. Vacationers increasingly looked for affordable and accessible options among woods and waters. Here visitors pitch their tents at a tourist camp on Shagawa Lake near Ely, Minnesota, circa 1930. photograph by the forest art company. courtesy of the minnesota historical society. Colorful promotional materials reinforced regional nicknames, as in this piece from 1940. courtesy of the minnesota historical society. Front and back covers of The Call of the Open Road (1922), an annual publication of the Milwaukee Journal Tour Department. The publication and the travel services of the Milwaukee Journal were addressed not only to Wisconsin motorists but especially to out-of-state tourists; the automobile and the state’s highways made northern Wisconsin more accessible to them. courtesy of the wisconsin historical society, whs image id 41273. ...

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Additional Information

ISBN
9780816688654
Related ISBN
9780816677931
MARC Record
OCLC
841906677
Pages
312
Launched on MUSE
2013-11-28
Language
English
Open Access
No
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