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Keith "Wolf" Anderson, Trombone and Bass Horn BORN: Chicago, July 18,1964 Played with the Young Men Brass Band (originating from the Tambourine and Fan Club), the Rebirth Brass Band, the Dirty Dozen Brass Band, the Regal Brass Band, and the Olympia Brass Band; currently freelancing Interviewed at the Crescent City Brewhouse, Decatur Street, September zooi I was born in Chicago. My parents were from here, but my daddy had moved to Chicago before I wasborn. Thefamily didn't move back to New Orleans until I was nineyearsold. That's when I first heard kids my age playing onthe street.Man, that tripped meout. Right there, I knew what I wasgoing to do. I knew I had to bea musician. Like, even today, my daddy runs a trucking business, and my brothers and sisters all workfor him—Iguess it makes me kind of the black sheep, butI couldn't do all that sitting behind a desk,you know? When wegot back to New Orleans,I attended BellJunior High. The musical director was Mr. Richardson;he started me out on trumpet with the school band. After I'd been playing for a couple of years, I went over by the Tambourine and Fan Club. That's a social clubfor young people, over on Claiborne,run by Mr. Jerome Smith. As well as sports activities, they had a little brass band, and I startedplaying trumpet with them. Later on, the Tambourine and Fan band went out on their own—they were working under the name of the Young Men BrassBand. Wewere all still at high school. Remember I said that theyoung kidsplaying on the street was myfirst inspiration? It was around this time that I came across my second—Anthony "Tuba Fats" Lacen. I never learned anything aboutformal harmony—as far as I'm concerned, if Tuba does it, it's right, and if he doesn't, it'sprobably wrong. Keith Anderson, Copenhagen Photo by Peter Nissen "7 He is the MAN! I heard him inJackson Square, and I couldn't believe it—he isjust so good. Tuba says his inspiration on bass was Wilbert Tillman. Of course, heflays a little more modern than Tillman, and Iflay a little more modern than Tuba. That was the cause of me taking uf bass horn. Heflays with suchpassion andfeeling, and that's the wayIflay too.Howyougoing toflay what's inyou ifyou don't give it 100percent of yourself? Ninety percent isn't enough. I say to other musicians, "If you don't give the music everythingyou've got, why should an audience giveyou anything at all? I mean, why should they hireyou?" To me,flaying music isn't about money. Obviously,you have to take care of business, but when I go onagig, I like to dothatfirst. It only takesfive minutes, and then my mind isfree to concentrate on the reason I'm there in thefirstf lace—flaying music. Anyway, toget back to the story—I had a littlefart-time job when I was in high school, and I was coming homefrom work one night when I heard the sound of a band comingfrom a house. I went in there, and it wasPhilip Frazier, Keith Frazier, Kermit Ruffins—what later became the Rebirth. They wereflaying sort of high school music, from charts they had got at school.I said to them, "Man, y'all sound good. You should flay jazz, makeyourself some money." They all laughed at me! What they didn't know was that I was a musician. What they also didn 't know was that I always used to like to mess with otherguy's horns, at high schooland in the Tambourine and Fan band. So I had some experience of flaying trombone, bass drum, snare drum—I couldn't flay them well, but I knew what to do. And of course I already flayed trumfet and bass horn. That's how I was able to help the otherguys and show them what to do. Of course, Philip Frazier was the tuba flayer, so I had to switch horns again—this time to trombone . I love it—you have to be soprecise, and I love a challenge.But whenyou got that right, the trombone is the most expressive of instruments. My favorite trombone flayer is Wendell Eugene. So we started toget it together and work in the French Quarter every day—the full eight-piece band, which is what it had become. Sure, we made afew dollars, but more important, we imf...

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Additional Information

ISBN
9780807155820
Related ISBN
9780807133330
MARC Record
OCLC
849949632
Pages
216
Launched on MUSE
2014-01-01
Language
English
Open Access
No
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