Index
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Index Abbott, Sam, 82–84, 204–5, 238–39 Abstract, 5–10; (move 150), 99, 230 Adams, James, 176, 181 Address a specific audience (move 185), 246 Address your anxiety toward writing (move 30), 162 Adjust distance (move 85), 189 Aesthetic and argumentative (move 153), 230 Analyze, 172–76; readability (move 199), 253; visuals (move 60), 175; the writing situation (move 1), 155; your audience and purpose (move 222), 261; your audiences (move 56), 173; your cultural eye (move 58), 174; your purposes (move 55), 173; your strengths as a writer (move 57), 173; your tastes (move 59), 174; your text, 251–53; your thesis (move 169), 243; your writing process (move 54), 172 Anderson, Allie, 11–14 Annotate (move 104), 203 Annotated bibliography, 11–18 Answer readers’ questions (move 159), 237 Answer the journalist’s questions (move 87), 189 Application essay, 19–26 Application letter, 27–32, 229 Apprehension may be situation-specific (move 40), 164 Argument, 33–44 ARTstor.org, 209 Ask focusing questions (move 155), 231; the assigner for ideas (move 2), 155; if you could end with your current last paragraph (move 42), 165; if your brain is telling you something (move 26), 162; So what? (move 156), 232; “What’s not there?” (move 91), 192; your teacher or boss (move 48), 169 Audience, 155, 173 Back up to restart (move 187), 247 Ballenger, Bruce, 73–75 Banish the idea that good writers are just “gifted ” (move 34), 163 Barthelme, Donald, 166 Bernhisel, Alyson, and Kendra Homan, 99–104 Bierce, Ambrose, 193 Blindfold your critic (move 23), 161 278    INDEX Blogs, 45–50 Boots, Michelle Theriault, 92–94 Brainstorm, 179–83, 224–28; (move 69), 179; ends (move 144), 227; leads (move 143), 226; a list of contexts (move 89), 189–90; songs and song lines (move 101), 203; titles (move 142), 225–26 Break the sentence into parts (move 206), 255 Bring yourself back into it (move 45), 165 Brown, Greg, 196–97 Carey, Joyce, 164 Caring, 157 Cather, Willa, 220 Challenge “rules” and myths about writing process (move 37), 164 Challenge the procrastination justification (move 15), 158 Change perspective (move 81), 188 Change your perspective (move 44), 165 Change your tools or habits (move 27), 162 Check the flow (move 139), 220 Choose (move 76), 182 Choose the appropriate graphic (move 130), 216 Choose your medium (move 223), 261 Coleridge, Samuel Taylor, 167 Combine sentences or ideas (move 213), 256 Conquering process problems, 166 Consider your source (move 112), 205 Contexts and connections (move 51), 170 Convert participles to main verbs (move 211), 256 Cooper, James Fenimore, 65, 220 Copy images (move 116), 208 Create a persona (move 75), 181 Cross-read with someone (move 218), 258 Curriculum vitae, 125 Cut and paste (move 205), 255 Define (move 94), 193 Define the critical (move 53), 171 Dethier, Corey, 21–23 Dethier, Megan, 242 Develop, 186–199; in business, 198; mantra (move 22), 161; thesis (move 97), 194–95 Dickey, James, 163 Discover, 167–85; in science, 183 Discover sources that you can exploit (move 12), 157 Discuss writing apprehension (move 31), 163 Double-entry journal (move 106), 204–5 Draft, 244–47 Easy does it, 165–66 Edson, Mark, 45–47 Email, 51–54 End with the current paragraph? (move 42), 165 Examine the links (move 198), 252 Examine your “equals signs” (move 216), 257 Executive summary, 8 Expand, 192–94; (move 92), 193 Expand then choose: The Accordion Principle (move 152), 230 Expand the scope of your revision (move 202), 254 Experiment, 188–89, 228–30, 239–41 Explain to integrate (move 127), 214 Explain your code words (move 93), 193 Explore with your senses (move 49), 170 Figure out why you’re not writing (move 14), 158 Fill in the blanks (move 141), 224–25 Find a focusing detail (move 146), 22; the detail that speaks for your subject (move 88), 189; a human face (move 11), 157; an idea, 155–57; a model (move 163), 240; the overlap (move 86), 189; the problem/tension/conflict (move 145), 228; what soothes your critic (move 24), 161 Focus, 222–33 Focused brainstorming (move 70), 179 Focus for different audiences (move 148), 229 Focusing in family therapy, 231–32 Focus with freewriting (move 140), 224 Follow the most basic English sentence pattern (move 204), 254 Follow through on your promises (move 25), 161 Force yourself to read intelligently (move 154), 230–31 Frame it (move 151), 230 Frederick, Alyson, 28–29, 123–24 Freewrite...



Subject Headings

  • English language -- Composition and exercises -- Study and teaching.
  • Literary form -- Study and teaching.
  • Language arts.
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