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AFTERWORD On May Day 1995, a sequence of events echoing two of the themes presented here left me convinced that the Comstock will survive for a long time to come. I traveled to Virginia City to videotape the house of Carol and Joe Page, who wish to leave their property to the Comstock Historic District Commission to serve as a museum. Their gift required them to describe the hundreds of furnishings and ornaments that make the house a remarkable portal into the past. The winter had been unusually wet, and on my way up the mountain, storm clouds spit rain. Small wildflowers cloaked much of the land, giving it a purple cast here and there. Cheatgrass and young mustard plants made the hills a vivid green, an unusual color for a Nevada landscape sure to grow yellow and brown with the heat of summer. Carol has a fantastic memory for details and provided a history for almost all the objects that she had collected. She andJoe had worked lovingly for years to restore their house, which was built in 1864. In the same spirit, they selected furnishings that were precisely appropriate for the house. Whenever possible, they purchased Comstock relics, saving them from slipping away from the district. Indeed, preserving the Comstock is a decades-old ambition with them, and it has not stopped at their property. Joe is a long-term member of the Comstock Historic District Commission, and Carol helped found and promote Historic Preservation Weekend on the Comstock, making their house available for numerous house tours. During the course of videotaping as Carol described her home, it became clear that the physical reminders of the Comstock were not the only things she had preserved. Often she would stop at a piece of furniture and point out, "This folding table belonged to John Mackay, and he AFTERWORD On May Day 1995, a sequence of events echoing two of the themes presented here left me convinced that the Comstock will survive for a long time to come. I traveled to Virginia City to videotape the house of Carol and Joe Page, who wish to leave their property to the Comstock Historic District Commission to serve as a museum. Their gift required them to describe the hundreds of furnishings and ornaments that make the house a remarkable portal into the past. The winter had been unusually wet, and on my way up the mountain, storm clouds spit rain. Small wildflowers cloaked much of the land, giving it a purple cast here and there. Cheatgrass and young mustard plants made the hills a vivid green, an unusual color for a Nevada landscape sure to grow yellow and brown with the heat of summer. Carol has a fantastic memory for details and provided a history for almost all the objects that she had collected. She andJoe had worked lovingly for years to restore their house, which was built in 1864. In the same spirit, they selected furnishings that were precisely appropriate for the house. Whenever possible, they purchased Comstock relics, saving them from slipping away from the district. Indeed, preserving the Comstock is a decades-old ambition with them, and it has not stopped at their property. Joe is a long-term member of the Comstock Historic District Commission, and Carol helped found and promote Historic Preservation Weekend on the Comstock, making their house available for numerous house tours. During the course of videotaping as Carol described her home, it became clear that the physical reminders of the Comstock were not the only things she had preserved. Often she would stop at a piece of furniture and point out, "This folding table belonged to John Mackay, and he used it in his box at Piper's Opera House" or "I bought this chair from Aileen]acobsen, who assured me that it was from the Comstock." %thout these recollections, the Pages' antiques would have been merely old objects from any number of places. Instead, their oral tradition preserves yet another aspect of the mining district's heritage. For more than a century and continuing into the present, the people of the Comstock have shaped their past with the stories they tell. The reality of the place, including the houses and other buildings that dot the landscape and the facts of its history, provides parameters to ensure that those who tell the stories do not stray too far. Nonetheless, the community's folklore about itself will persist as Comstockers continue to define their own...

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Additional Information

ISBN
9780874174175
Related ISBN
9780874173208
MARC Record
OCLC
45731915
Pages
384
Launched on MUSE
2014-01-01
Language
English
Open Access
No
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