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12 SAINT JOHN CHRYSOSTOM Therefore, in order that we may free ourselves from punishments in the present life and from the penalty to be paid in the life to come, let us reject this passion and display all gentleness and meekness, so that even here we may find rest for our souls, and also in the kingdom of heaven. May it be the lot of all of us to attain this by the grace and mercy of our Lord Jesus Christ. Through Him and with Him glory be to the Father, together with the Holy Spirit, now and always, forever and ever. Amen. Homily 49 (fohn 7.9-24) 'When he had said these things to them he stayed on in Galilee. But as soon as his brethren had gone up to the feast, then he also went up, not publicly, but as it were privately.'l The actions performed by Christ in a human way were so performed not merely for the purpose of confirming the Incarnation, but also that He might instruct us to virtuous living. For, if He did everything as God, whence would we be able to learn what we ought to do when faced with trials outside the realm of our experience? I mean, for example, in this very instance, by proceeding right into the midst of the murderous Jews He checked their purpose. But, if He always acted thus, whence would we who are unable to do this know how we ought to act when we encounter difficulty? How would we know whether we ought to submit to death at once, or whether we, too, ought to make some provision so that our preaching might continue? Therefore , since we, who have not His power, would not know what we ought to do upon coming forth into the midst of our enemies, for this reason He gave us instruction in this regard. 'When Jesus had said these things,' the Evangelist says, 1 John 7.9,10. HOMILIES 13 'he stayed on in Galilee. But as soon as his brethren had gone up, then he also went up, not publicly, but as it were privately.' The words, 'His brethren had gone up,' are intended to show that He did not wish to go up with them. And therefore He stayed on in the place where He was and did not make Himself publicly known, though they were pressing Him to do so. But why in the world did He who always preached publicly now do so 'as it were privately'? The Evangelist did not say 'secretly,' but 'as it were privately.' For, as I have said, Christ had to act in this way to instruct us how to conduct ourselves. Besides, it was not reasonable to put in an appearance rashly while they were angry and disturbed, but it was advisable to appear afterwards, when the feast was over. 'The Jews therefore were looking for him and saying, "Where is he?" , What worthy conduct during the feast! Bent on murder, they wished to apprehend Him during the festival. To be sure, they also spoke like this elsewhere: 'What do you think, that he is not coming to the feast?'2 Here they said: 'Where is he?' Because of their deep hatred and enmity they were not even willing to call Him by name. They were certainly showing great respect for the feast, great reverence! By means of the very feast they wished to hunt Him down. 'And there was much whispered comment among the crowd concerning him.' Now it seems to me that it was by very reason of the place where the miracle had been worked that they were excited and at the same time angry and afraid. They were not so much vexed because of His coming, as afraid lest He might again perform some such miracle. But everything turned out just the opposite of their wishes, and they themselves brought Him to public notice, without intending to do so. Now, 'Some were saying, "He is a good man." But others were saying, "No. Rather, ht- seduces the crowd." , 2 John 11.56. 14 SAINT JOHN CHRYSOSTOM Therefore, I think that the first opinion was that of the multitude, while the latter was that of the rulers and priests, for the slander was the work of their envy and wickedness. 'He seduces the people,' they said. In doing what, if you please? It was not because He was pretending and not really working miracles...

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Additional Information

ISBN
9780813211411
Related ISBN
9780813210254
MARC Record
OCLC
647919787
Pages
507
Launched on MUSE
2013-05-20
Language
English
Open Access
No
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