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Notes Introduction 1. Rosalind Gill, Gender and the Media (Malden, Mass.: Polity, 2007), 40. 2. See for example, Randal Johnson and Robert Stam, eds., BrazilianCinema (New York: Columbia University Press, 1995); Ismail Xavier, Allegories of Underdevelopment : Aesthetics and Politics in Modern Brazilian Cinema (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1997); and Randal Johnson, The Film Industry in Brazil: Culture and the State (Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 1987). 3. Elice Munerato and Maria Helena Darcy de Oliveira, “When Women Film,” in Brazilian Cinema, eds. Randal Johnson and Robert Stam (New York: Columbia University Press, 1995), 340–50. 4. Shortly after this date, the studio was renamed Brasil Vita Filmes. Ana Pessoa, Carmen Santos: O cinema dos anos 20 (Rio de Janeiro: Aeroplano, 2002), 163, 173. 5. Indeed, this is an area of inquiry in Brazilian Film Studies that merits a study of its own. 6. Heloisa Buarque de Hollanda, ed., Quase catálogo: Realizadoras de cinema no Brasil (1930/1988) (Rio de Janeiro: CIEC, 1987), 8. 7. Ibid., 9. 8. Amélia Cohn, “A questão social no Brasil: A difícil construção da cidadania,” in Viagem incompleta: A experiência brasileira: 1500–2000, ed. Carlos Guilherme Mota (São Paulo: SENAC, 2000), 389–92. 9. Evelina Dagnino, “Culture, Citizenship and Democracy: Changing Discourses and Practices of the Latin American Left,” in Culture of Politics, Politics of Culture: Re-visioning Latin American Social Movements, eds. Sonia Alvarez, Evelina Dagnino, and Arturo Escobar (Boulder: Westview, 1998), 48. 10. For a thorough historical account of the women’s movements in Brazil, see Marsh_Text.indd 185 8/7/12 2:34 PM 186 . Notes to introduction and Chapter 1 Sonia M. Alvarez, Engendering Democracy in Brazil: Women’s Movements in Transition Politics (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1990). 11. See T. H. Marshall, Citizenship and Social Class, and Other Essays (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1950), 1–24. 12. See Margaret Somers, “Citizenship and the Place of the Public Sphere: Law, Community, and Political Culture in the Transition to Democracy,” American Sociological Review 58, no. 5 (1993): 587–620. 13. Nira Yuval-Davis, “Women, Citizenship and Difference,” Feminist Review 57 (1997): 6. 14. Paul Thompson, The Voice of the Past: Oral History (New York: Oxford University Press, 2000), 1–24. 15. The director’s full name is Ana Carolina Teixeira Soares, but she has signed her film works as “Ana Carolina,” dropping her surnames. Chapter 1. Brazilian Women’s Filmmaking and the State during the 1970s and 1980s 1. Randal Johnson and Robert Stam, Brazilian Cinema, 340. 2. Paul Thompson, The Voice of the Past: Oral History (New York: Oxford University Press, 2000), 1–24. 3. GEICINE stands for Grupo Executivo da Indústria Cinematográfica, or the Executive Group for the Cinema Industry. 4. José Mário Ortiz Ramos, Cinema, estado, e lutas culturais (Rio de Janeiro: Paz e Terra, 1983), 19–23. 5. Helena Solberg, interview by author, tape recording, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, November 27, 2001. 6. Randal Johnson, Film Industry, 132. 7. Ibid., 114–19, 121–23. 8. Numbers drawn from Hollanda, ed., Quase catálogo. 9. Suzana Amaral, interview by author, tape recording, São Paulo, Brazil, November 14, 2001, and Helena Solberg, interview by author, tape recording, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, November 27, 2001. 10. Tereza Trautman, interview by author, tape recording, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, November 29, 2001. 11. Tata Amaral, interview by author, tape recording, São Paulo, Brazil, November 13, 2001. 12. For example, at this time, the news segment Globo Repórter was filmed on 35 mm film stock and then edited to show on television. 13. Sandra Werneck, interview by author, tape recording, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, July 16, 2002. 14. Julia Lesage, “Women Make Media: Three Modes of Production,” in The Social Documentary in Latin America, ed. Julianne Burton (Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 1990), 315–47. Marsh_Text.indd 186 8/7/12 2:34 PM Notes to Chapter 1 · 187 15. Werneck, interview, November 13, 2001. 16. Ana Maria Magalhães, interview by author, tape recording, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, November 28, 2001. 17. Ana Carolina recalls that there were approximately four female students in a group of about thirty when she studied at the Escola de São Luiz in São Paulo starting in 1966. Note that she is unclear during the interview when the school closed and when she stopped studying there. In contrast, Tizuka Yamasaki recalls one other female student when she studied in Brasília...

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Additional Information

ISBN
9780252094378
Related ISBN
9780252037252
MARC Record
OCLC
868215670
Pages
256
Launched on MUSE
2014-01-01
Language
English
Open Access
No
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