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The African American Roots of Modernism This page intentionally left blank The African American Roots of Modernism From Reconstruction to the Harlem Renaissance J A M E S S M E T H U R S T The University of North Carolina Press Chapel Hill © 2011 The University of North Carolina Press All rights reserved Manufactured in the United States of America Designed by Jacquline Johnson Set in Walbaum MT by Tseng Information Systems, Inc. The paper in this book meets the guidelines for permanence and durability of the Committee on Production Guidelines for Book Longevity of the Council on Library Resources. The University of North Carolina Press has been a member of the Green Press Initiative since 2003. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Smethurst, James Edward. The African American roots of modernism : from Reconstruction to the Harlem Renaissance / James Smethurst. p. cm. — (The John Hope Franklin series in African American history and culture) Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN 978-0-8078-3463-3 (cloth : alk. paper) — ISBN 978-0-8078-7185-0 (pbk. : alk. paper) 1. American literature—African American authors—History and criticism. 2. Segregation in literature. 3. African Americans—Segregation. 4. African Americans—Intellectual life— 19th century. 5. African Americans—Intellectual life—20th century. 6. Modernism (Literature)—United States. I. Title. PS153.N5S555 2011 810.9′896073—dc22 2010047552 cloth15 14 13 12 115 4 3 2 1 paper15 14 13 12 115 4 3 2 1 Chapter 2 was published in different form as “Those Noble Sons of Ham: Poetry, Soldiers, and Citizens at the End of Reconstruction,” in Hope and Glory: Essays on the Legacy of the Massachusetts 54th, edited by Martin H. Blatt, Thomas J. Brown, and Donald Yacovone (Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 2001), 168–87. Portions of chapter 4 were published in different form in “Paul Laurence Dunbar and Turn of the Century African American Dualism,” African American Review 41.2 (Summer 2007): 377–86. Portions of the conclusion were published in different form in “The Red Is East: Claude McKay and the New Black Radicalism of the Twentieth Century,” American Literary History 21.2 (Summer 2009): 355–67. For Jacob This page intentionally left blank ...

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