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291 Notes Introduction 1. In conversations with author, 1997 and 1998. 2. Tom McCall interview, from American Dreams: Lost and Found, Studs Terkel, Knopf Doubleday Publishing Company, New York, 1980, page 335: “Heroes are not giant statues framed against a red sky. They are people who say: This is my community, and it is my responsibility to make it better.” Chapter 1 1. From “Bob Straub: A Personal Portrait.” Interview of Governor Robert Straub by Ted Bryant, KATU, Channel 2, Portland, Oregon, January 6, 1979. 2. Author interview of Jean Russell and Barbara Straub, February 27, 2007. 3. Ibid., and author phone interview with Jean Russell, August 26, 2007 4. Author interview of Jean Russell and Barbara Straub, February 27, 2007. 5. Governor Robert Straub interview, Clark Hansen, Oregon Historical Society, 14 May 1991, Tape 1, Side 1. This “is one of the lesser attractive areas of Kansas,” according to Bob Straub in an interview with Ted Bryant on KATU-TV Portland, in December, 1978. 6. Johann Jakob Friedrich (John Jacob Frederick) Straub, born in 1812 in Baden, Switzerland, married Anna Margarethe (Margaret Ann) Maichel (Michael), born in 1821, also in Switzerland, on November 7, 1841 in Coshocton County, Ohio. They had three children before moving to Jefferson County, Wisconsin, where Margaret gave birth to Francis Jefferson and six more siblings. By 1860, John and Margaret had moved to Grant Township in Caldwell County, Missouri, where Margaret bore two more children, for a total of twelve! Sources: Marriage Index: Ohio, 1789-1850 (Liahona Research, Orem UT); and Ohio, Wisconsin, and Missouri Census Indices (Ancestry.com). 7. Telephone interview of Alexander Russell III (Luke) by author on October 24, 2007. 8. Museum of the Kansas National Guard, Historic Units, The Twentieth Kansas Volunteers, Web site, 9. An indication of the common, openly racist and condescending attitudes among the new colonizers was the popularity of English writer Rudyard Kipling’s poem, “The White Man’s Burden,” with the subtitle “The United States and the Philippine Islands.” In it Kipling urges Americans to embrace the virtuous duty of colonialism to help civilize “new caught, sullen peoples, half devil and half child.” “The White Man’s Burden.” McClure’s Magazine 12 (Feb. 1899). 10. Museum of the Kansas National Guard, Historic Units, The Twentieth Kansas Volunteers, Web site. 11. From: Miller, Stuart Creighton (1982), “Benevolent Assimilation”: The American Conquest of the Philippines, 1899–1903, Yale University Press; and Matthew Smallman-Raynor, Matthew (1998), “The Philippines Insurrection and the 1902–4 cholera epidemic: Part I: Epidemiological diffusion processes in war,” Journal of Historical Geography 24 (1): 69–89. It was the Philippine-American War that introduced Americans to the form of interrogation and torture, developed during the Spanish Inquisition, that we now call ‘water-boarding.’ “Officers testified that the standard procedure when interrogating suspected insurgents was to use the ‘water cure,’ a method that had apparently been favored by Spanish officials. ‘That torture,’ occupation governor (and future U.S. president) William Howard Taft explained, ‘involves pouring water down the throat so 292 Standing at the Water’s Edge that the man swells and gets the impression that he is going to be suffocated and then tells what he knows.’” “The History of Torture – Why We Can’t Give It Up,” by Colin Woodard, Military History Quarterly, On-line Edition, August 9, 2011, http://www. historynet.com/the-history-of-torture%E2%80%94why-we-can’tgive-it-up.htm/1. 12. Telephone interview by author of Alexander Russell III (Luke) on October 24, 2007. 13. The officer corps of Private Straub’s Troop G from Independence had been particularly hard hit by Filipino sharpshooters, losing three, including, in their first major battle (Caloocan), the beloved Captain David S. Elliott, who had been editor of the Independence newspaper. Correspondence Relating to the War With Spain (vol 1 p.593), Adjutant-General’s Office, Walter Gentala, Kansas General Web. 14. Telephone interview of Barbara Straub by author, September 29, 2007. 15. Governor Robert Straub interview, Clark Hansen, Oregon Historical Society, 14 May 1991, Tape 1, Side 1. 16. Though it was a good job to begin with, it became more lucrative when the well-known world explorers and photographers, Martin and Osa Johnson, came back to Kansas and began buying a great deal of property. Thomas received a percentage of each deed he recorded. Governor Robert Straub interview, Clark Hansen, Oregon Historical Society, 14 May 1991, Tape 1, Side 1 and telephone interview of Jean Russell by...

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Additional Information

ISBN
9780870716706
Related ISBN
9780870716690
MARC Record
OCLC
830023892
Pages
352
Launched on MUSE
2012-12-20
Language
English
Open Access
No
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