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From: Black Athena

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NOTES Introduction 1. Tylor (1879). 2. Tylor (1896, 118). 3. Anon (1991), see also Weinstein (1992). 4. For a bibliography on the statue base, see Vol. 2. 431–4 and 617–8 and Cline (1994, 38–42) . For the Thera paintings see Morgan (1988) and Doumas (1992). [In these notes any mention of a volume and number without an author’s name refers to the Black Athena Project.] 5. For the Theban seals see Vol. 2, 507–9. For the Kaß shipwreck see Vol. 2, 472–3 and 624 and Cline (1994, 100–5). For the Tel Ed Daba’a frescoes, see Bietak (1995), Morgan (1995) and M. C. Shaw (1995). For the representations of Mycenaeans in Eighteenth Dynasty Egypt see G. T. Martin (1991, 48–9) and Parkinson and Scofield (1993). For the Aegean metals in Egypt see the bibliography in Vol. 2, 479–82 and 625 and Stos-Gale, Gale and Houghton (1995). 6. See Koutoulas, 2001. The Third Millennium dates have been used by the chauvinist group Davlos to claim that Greeks invented the pyramids. There is, however , no reason to doubt the dates Y. Liritsis and others reached through optical thermo-photo illumination. To achieve Greek priority, the spokesmen for Davlos have down-dated the Egyptian pyramids and do not mention the evidence of the development of the Egyptian pyramids. 7. See Burkert (1992, 2–3) and Morris (1992). 8. See Bernal (1995a, 302–4) and Bernal (2001, 313–6). 9. For a bibliography of Gordon’s voluminous work on cultural contacts around the East Mediterranean in the Bronze Age, see Vol. 1, 539–40. Astour (1967a). 10. See Walcot (1966) and West (1971). West’s work on Hesiod (1978) and (1985), which also emphasized Oriental connections, was published in the new atmosphere . For Ruth Edwards’ difficulties in finding a publisher see Vol. 1, 423–6. 11. Koenen (1994, 1). 12. See, for instance, Lefkowitz (1992a and b). 13. See for instance, H. G. Wells (1920), Chap. 14, and the Durants as opposed to Kitto (1951), Finley (1970) and Starr (1961). 14. For a discussion of Renfrew’s attack on his more broad-minded predecessors see Vol. 2, 67–74. See also Bernal (1993, 241–2). 15. Kristeller (1995). 16. Chomsky (1987). 17. For my position on the relative importance of the contributions of Mesopotamian and Egyptian thought and practice in the formation of Greek science, see Bernal (1992) and (1994). For objections to this see Palter (1993) and (1994) and my responses in Bernal (2001, 247–68). 18. See Fowden (1986), Iversen (1984), Scott (1991) and Jasnow and Zausich (1995). 19. See Rendsburg (1989) and Ray (1990) who were generally sympathetic and Jasanoff and Nussbaum (1996) and Egberts (1997) who detest my work. 20. Kristeller (1995, 127). 21. This issue is also discussed in Vol. 1, 3–4. 22. There is a good summary of this argument in Fairbank and Reischauer (1965, 386–7). 23. Koenen (1994), p.2. 24. See Blackall (1958). Interestingly, Skandanavian intellectuals tried to “purify” their languages by removing German loans. Gerard Manley Hopkins, C. S. Lewis, J. R. R. Tolkien and others have attempted similar purifications for English. Chapter 1 Historical Linguistics and the Image of Ancient Greek 1. Morpurgo-Davies (1998, 88–94). 2. Halevi was actually born in Castille though he made his name in Andalusia; see the sensitive study by Brann (1991, 84). For Halevi’s linguistic speculations, see Loewe (1994, 127). 3. For a survey of these translations and studies, see Dillmann and Bezold (1907, 11–3). 4. See Vol. 1, 171. 5. Morpurgo-Davies (1998, 45). 6. Blench (2002b, 5). 7. Cannon (1990, 244–5) and Morpurgo-Davies (1998, 65). 8. Muller (1986). 9. For this scheme, see Morpurgo-Davies (1998, 14). 10. Aarsleff (1988, xl–lxv). 11. Morpurgo-Davies (1998, 98). 12. Vol. 1, 215–336. 13. Vol. 1, 286–7. 14. For the details, see Koerner (1989, 149–77). 588 NOTES TO PAGES 4–32 15. This is discussed in Vol. 1, 370–3. 16. See Koerner (1989, 203). 17. For the influence of ninteenth-century geology on the Neo-Grammarians, see Christy (1983). A fervent faith in uniformitarianism can still be found in the twentyfirst century; see Ringe et al. (2002, 60). 18. See Jankowsky (1968, 98). 19. This is admitted by Jasanoff and Nussbaum (1996, 181). 20. See Jakobson and Waugh (1990). 21. Bolinger (1950), Malkiel (1990) and Blench (1997, 170). 22. Trask (1996, 287–90). 23. For the few exceptions...


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