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Index “accent ceiling,” 88, 140–41 acculturation, 7, 74, 149, 153, 172, 193–95, 200, 203 anthropology of migration, 4–5, 219n3 Asians: in America, 83; in Australia, 9, 72, 76, 223n4 assimilation: in America, 6–7; in Australia, 71, 74, 76, 197; concept of, 4–5, 7; and English language, 87; ethnic-path, 204; and nation-state, 74; new perspectives on, 7; return to, 7; segmented, 7 “astronaut families,” 9, 220n6 Australia: Anglo-Saxon majority, 74; migrating to, 2–3; national mythology, 14; overseas-born population, 70–71, 164, 224n2; settlement policies, 73, 76, 195; white colonization, 14, 70–71; white majority, 72 Australian culture: Anglo-Australian, 85, 153; and egalitarianism, 79; as ethnocentric, 76; and values, 78; of working class, 79 authoritarianism: in the Balkans, 42; communist, 42, 44; in Croatian society, 42, 49; cross-culturally, 226n2; in Eastern Europe, 34, 221n2; religious, 40; rural, 37, 221n7; in Yugoslavia, 43–44, 49, 159, 181, 183–84 Balkans, the, 16, 33, 41–42, 59, 177, 207, 212, 222n2 belonging, 2, 104, 117, 166, 227 Blato (a village in Dalmatia), 1, 2, 113, 127, 168brain drain, 12, 56, 59, 64–65, 128, 206 chain migration, 31, 64–65, 117, 168 Chicago school of sociology, 5, 219n2 citizenship, 6, 130, 171, 206–8, 214, 217 class: in America, 17; as analytical axis, 180, 217; in Australia, 17; as concept, 16–17; and education, 18; and ethnic community, 121; intersecting with ethnicity, 4, 85–86, 209–10, 216; by Karl Marx, 17; by Max Weber, 17–18; middle class, 18; working class, 18 communism: Eastern European, 33–34, 43–44, 72, 59, 184, 194; in Marxist theory, 221n1; and modernization, 33, 40; and religion , 39, 214; values, 146; in Yugoslavia, 12, 32, 36, 45–46, 50–51, 64–65, 128–29, 149, 162, 182, 206 conservatism, 226n3 cosmopolitanism, 6, 11, 87; cosmopolitanism studies, 6 cosmopolitans, 6, 173 Croatia: authoritarian politics, 48–49; Catholic church, 48–49, 177; Catholicism, 48, 60, 167, 177; Catholic revival, 171; cities, 30; communist ideology, 50; “democracy deficit,” 175; family regime, 186; history, 60, 63; housing, 101–2; Independent State of, 35; political values, 42, 49–50; private i-xiv_1-258_Coli.indd 249 9/23/08 11:11:19 AM 250 . index renting, 133; rural culture, 166; rural living , 109; rural-urban divide, 32, 64; system of dwelling allocation, 133, 224n2; Western values, 52 Croatian Fraternal Union (CFU), 161–62 “Croatianness,” 19, 144, 163, 167, 175 Croatians in Australia: alleged terrorism , 159; attitudes of two cohorts compared , 181–86; attitudes on egalitarianism , 184–85; and Catholic church, 177; diaspora, 158; education, 185–86; ethnic community, 67, 172; home ownership, 132, 134; immigration numbers, 68; in industries , 63; involvement in ethnic community , 174; language shift, 107; middle-class, 18; numbers, 12–13; perception of Australian culture, 153, 155, 187–92; professionals, 12, 23, 28; public image, 164; public representation , 171, 177; religiousness, 174; rural cohort, 15–16; separatism (Croatia from Yugoslavia), 159; social status, 86; stereotypes of, 159–60, 167; uptake of Australian citizenship, 207; values, 181–86; workingclass , 12, 18–19, 26–27, 86; 1980s cohort, 24–26, 52, 59; as “Yugoslavs,” 69 Croatians in New Zealand, 170 Croatians in the United States: diaspora, 161; early twentieth-century immigrants, 61–62; family, 191; relationship with Catholic Church, 161; second- and thirdgeneration , 161 Croatians in Western Australia, professional cohort: Australian identity, 139; bilingualism, 140; children’s education, 149; communication styles, 137; “consonant acculturation,” 149; cosmopolitan orientation, 152–53, 208; cultural learning, 137–38; ethnic community, 143–44; family obligations, 152; foreign accent and status, 139–40; gender roles, 150–51; group boundaries, 144; home ownership and, 132–34; homes, 134; identification, 143–44; identity, 136, 139, 144, 151, 169, 206; language shift, 149; leisure, 147; lifestyle, 148; motives for migration, 128–30; networks, 145, 151, 173, 203, 208; “object orientation” (“goal orientation”), 146, 152; patterns of consumption, 146–47; perfecting English, 135–36; professional identity, 169; professional status, 146; residential dispersion, 134; “self-actualizing,” 148; social aspirations , 144; social status, 140, 143, 145–46, 148; status allocation, 145; status symbols, 147; suburban isolation, 134; visits to homeland, 151–52; women and work, 150 Croatians in Western Australia, workingclass cohort, 24–26, 59; Catholic values, 122–23; closed community, 120–22; clubs, 117; conformity, 121; divorce, views on, 122–23; ethnic bubble, 120, 122, 208; ethnic identity, 169–71; ethnic identity enlargement , 170–71; ethnocentrism, 183; family cohesion, 125; family obligations, 102, 124–25; households, 101; gendered patterns of leisure...

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