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295 N O T E S introduction 1. Henry R. Luce, oral history transcript, 11 November 1965, John F. Kennedy Library, 13, http://www.jfklibrary.org; Jeffrey Schmalz, “Resurgent Waterbury Prepares to Greet Candidate Reagan,” New York Times (19 September 1984), B1; David M. Lubin, Shooting Kennedy: JFK and the Culture of Images (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2003), 124–25; Mary Evertz, “Charm Takes Over in Tampa,” St. Petersburg Times (11 November 1999), http://www.sptimes.com/News/111199. 2. Seymour Hersh, “Darker Than We Want to Know” (8 January 1998), www .theatlantic.com; Richard Reeves, President Kennedy: Profile in Power (New York: Simon and Schuster, 1993), 291; Tony Alessandra, “Why Charisma Matters,” www .frugalmarketing.com/dtb/charisma.shtml. 3. Mario Puzo, The Last Don (New York: Random House, 1996), 27. 4. Norman Mailer, “Superman Comes to the Supermarket,” Esquire (November 1960), http://www.esquire.com/features. A ferocious attack on the modern notion of charisma, which is found to be antithetical to its classical religious formulation, is Philip Reiff, Charisma: The Gift of Grace, and How It Has Been Taken Away from Us (New York: Pantheon, 2007). 5. Grace de Monaco, oral history transcript, 19 June 1965, John F. Kennedy Library, 3, http://www.jfklibrary.org. 6. Jack Valenti, “The Unpredictable World of Politics: Lessons I Have Learned,” lecture, San Marcos, Texas, 3 April 1997, http://www.txstate.edu/commonexperience/ pastsitearchives/2008-2009/lbjresources. 7. Leo Braudy, The Frenzy of Renown: Fame and Its History (New York: Oxford University Press, 1986), esp. parts 1 and 5. 8. Fred Inglis, A Short History of Celebrity (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2010), esp. chaps. 3 and 4. See also Braudy, Frenzy of Renown, part 5. 296 notes to pages 10–20 9. My research on Walker for a previous book helped inspire me to explore the impact on the presidency of mass entertainment. Burton W. Peretti, Nightclub City: Politics and Amusement in Manhattan (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2007), chap. 2. 10. Ronald Brownstein, The Power and the Glitter: The Hollywood-Washington Connection (New York: Pantheon, 1990); Kathleen Hall Jamieson, Packaging the Presidency: A History and Criticism of Presidential Campaign Advertising, 3d ed. (New York: Oxford University Press, 1996); Alan Schroeder, Celebrity in Chief: How Show Business Took Over the White House (Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 2004). chapter 1: “the torments of desire” 1. Michael Kammen, A Machine That Would Go of Itself: The Constitution in American Culture (New York: Knopf, 1986). 2. Ernst H. Kantorowicz, The King’s Two Bodies: A Study in Mediæval Political Theology (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1970). 3. James Thomas Flexner, Washington: The Indispensable Man (New York: Collins , 1976). 4. Robert H. Wiebe, The Opening of American Society: From the Adoption of the Constitution to the Eve of Disunion (New York: Vintage, 1985), 115; Dumas Malone, Jefferson the President: First Term, 1801–1805 (Boston: Little, Brown, 1970), 170–175, 378–385. 5. Carl Sferrazza Anthony, First Ladies: The Saga of the President’s Wives and Their Power, 1789–1961 (New York: Morrow, 1990), parts 2 and 3. 6. Karen Halttunen, Confidence Men and Painted Women: A Study of Middle-Class Culture in America, 1830–1870 (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1983), chap. 3; Fred Inglis, A Short History of Celebrity (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2010), esp. chap. 3. 7. Anthony, First Ladies, 126–134. 8. Daniel Walker Howe, The Political Culture of the American Whigs (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1979), 89; Abraham Lincoln, “Address to the Young Men’s Lyceum of Springfield, Illinois, January 27, 1838,” in Don E. Fehrenbacher, ed., Abraham Lincoln: Speeches and Writings (New York: Library of America, 1989), 1:34. 9. Samuel Kernell and Gary C. Jacobson, “Congress and the Presidency as News in the Nineteenth Century,” Journal of Politics 49 (1987): 1016–1035; Sean Wilentz, The Rise of American Democracy: Jefferson to Lincoln (New York: Norton, 2005), esp. chaps. 9, 11, and 16; Daniel Walker Howe, What Hath God Wrought: The Transformation of America, 1815–1848 (New York: Oxford University Press, 2007), chap. 7, 543–546. 10. See for example Mary P. Ryan, Civic Wars: Democracy and Public Life in the American City during the Nineteenth Century (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998). notes to pages 20–31 297 11. Henry Adams, The Education of Henry Adams, rept. ed. (Boston: HoughtonMif flin, 1961), 266; Henry Adams, Democracy: An American Novel, rept. ed. (New York: Airmont, 1968), 50. 12. James Bryce, The American...

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Additional Information

ISBN
9780813554051
Related ISBN
9780813554044
MARC Record
OCLC
811410932
Pages
344
Launched on MUSE
2012-10-01
Language
English
Open Access
No
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