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Index Page numbers for photographs are in italics. Abramson, Glenda, 12, 63, 264, 371n37 “Advanced Training for Angels” (Amichai), 52 alienation: in imagery of “We Loved Here” sonnets, 232, 234; and use of German language, 128–29 “All These Make a Strange Dance Rhythm” (Amichai), 96 Amichai, Yehuda, 187, 188, 189, 190: and autobiographical references in “Binyamina , 1947” and “We Loved Here” sonnets , 209–42; and childhood memories in Not of This Time, Not of This Place, 62– 100; development as poet as reflected in letters to Ruth Z., 290–312; and feminine traits, 203, 217, 287, 308–11, 421n117; and immigration of parents to Palestine, 160–78; influence of love affair with Ruth Z on life of, 2–5, 191–208; and “In the Public Garden” as poetic innovation , 243–66; references to childhood in Poems: 1948–1962, 47–62, 88; reinterpretation of poetic works, 5–25, 313–23; transformation from immigrant child into Israeli patriot during 1947–1948 in Haifa, 267–89; use of languages as strategy of camouflage, 101– 50. See also camouflage; childhood; education ; German language; Hebrew language ; Jerusalem; landscape; letters; love affair; music; name; specific works “And After All This—the Rain” (Amichai), 123–24 Andersen, Hans Christian, 37, 81–82, 113, 114, 199, 275, 382n56 “And the Migration of My Parents” (Amichai ), 160–78, 218, 340–41 “And We Shall Not Get Excited” (Amichai), 119–21 antisemitism, in Germany, 27, 35, 368n181 Arab Revolt of 1936–1939, 155, 413n47. See also Palestine archaeologist: and protagonist of Not of This Time, Not of This Place, 65; and role of poet in “Hada’aya,” 299, 300 army (British), 158–59, 193–94, 277. See also War of Independence Arpali (Arpaly), Boaz, 244, 355n29, 404n38, 408n9, 411n1, 412n26, 419n69 assimilation: camouflage as method of social and cultural, 19; of German language into Amichai’s writings, 150 “Aswan Dam, The” (Amichai), 88, 98 “At Twilight” (Bialik), 233, 407n85, 407n90 Auden, W. H., 159 “Autobiography 1952” (Amichai), 11–13, 168, 169, 265, 397n36 “Autumn” (Amichai), 111, 303 Bamberger, Rabbi Nathan, 27 Bamberger, Rabbi Seligmann Baer, 27, 72 Beer-Hofmann, Richard, 109–10 Ben Gurion, David, 270 Bet Hakerem Teachers Seminary, 191, 192 Bialik, H. N., 63, 233, 403n22, 406n85, 407n90 Bible, 9, 51, 134, 145, 148, 236–37, 238, 287, 293, 320–21, 389n199 bikkurim (Jewish holiday), 261–62 Binyamina, Palestine, and Amichai’s love affair with Ruth Z., 200–202 “Binyamina, 1947” (Amichai): as legacy of love affair with Ruth Z., 209–19; and Now and in Other Days, 241; textual interrelation between “We Loved Here” sonnets and, 221, 222–23, 229, 230–31, 234, 241 Bluwstein, Rahel, 217 body, and poetic imagery, 167, 169–70, 292 Book of Songs (Heine 1827), 135, 136 Brenner, Binyamin, 201 camouflage: and autobiographical connections in “In the Public Garden,” 245, 410n50; and autobiographical references in Poems: 1948–1962, 47–56, 89; embodiment of strategy in “Not Like a Cypress,” 311–12; and experience of immigration , 161–62, 165, 170, 172, 178; and memories of Wuerzburg, 357n1; and reinterpretation of poetry, 5–25, 313–23; strategy of in “We Loved Here” sonnets, 219, 224, 242; and use of genres , 48; and use of German and Hebrew languages, 101–50; and use of language in “Elegy on the Lost Child,” 61 childhood, of Amichai: adolescence in Palestine , 151–59, 160; and camouflage as strategy, 5, 21; and development of language , 378–79n8; early years in Wuerzburg , 5–7, 26–46; and identification with pupils as teacher, 278; images of in letters to Ruth Z., 291; and language in Not of This Time, Not of This Place, 138–39, 141; references to in Poems: 1948–1962, 47–100; and use of German language, 149–50. See also Hanover, Ruth; Wuerzburg chronology: of “In the Public Garden,” 245, 247, 251, 262; and reading of Poems: 1948–1962, 314; in “We Loved Here” sonnets, 221, 225–28, 233, 238– 39, 242. See also scrambling “Clouds Are the First to Die, The” (Amichai ), 94–95 comfort, and use of German language, 130, 386n123 death: and “Binyamina, 1947” sonnets, 215–17; and experience of immigration , 163; and Holocaust references in “Elegy on the Lost Child,” 59–60; images of in “Not Like a Cypress,” 310; and letters to Ruth Z, 113–14; and use of German language, 129 Declaration of Independence (Israeli), 240, 277 denial, in “Binyamina, 1947,” 216 “Der Erlkoenig” (Goethe), 145–48 diaries: Amichai’s, 107, 157...


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